game theory

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game theory

[′gām ‚thē·ə·rē]
(mathematics)
The mathematical study of games or abstract models of conflict situations from the viewpoint of determining an optimal policy or strategy. Also known as theory of games.

game theory

see THEORY OF GAMES.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this paper, we have proposed a privacy-preserving set-intersection protocol in two-party settings from the game-theoretic perspective.
Our game-theoretic model of public-private partnerships predicts that such ventures will suffer from underinvestment, but how serious is this underinvestment problem in the real world, and what are the most cost-effective solutions to this problem?
Real-world R&D consortia appear to be an extremely complex and diverse phenomenon that does not lend itself for game-theoretic modeling.
8) Schmalensee (1988) also recognizes the contribution of game theory but calls for more empirical research by stating that: "While game-theoretic tools are well-suited in principle to the analysis of key aspects of business behavior, their application has neither produced a general theory of market operation nor given one much reason to expect such a theory to emerge in the foreseeable future.
Unlike the model originally developed by Butnariu (1978, 1979), this is an ordinal game and differs from the standard game-theoretic formulation only by allowing for fuzzy lexicographic preferences.
In the game-theoretic routing example discussed above, the number of players equals the number of network users, and the number of actions equals the number of routes through the network.
two Sections outline the answers offered by a game-theoretic model of
Although signaling often is not included in game-theoretic models, prior empirical research has shown that signaling can influence group decision behavior.
The current study applied a new game-theoretic DEA model to evaluate the relative overall efficiencies of two principle HMO categories, viz.
As was discussed above, to develop any game-theoretic model, one first needs a measure of utility, a means by which one can express the decision-maker's preferences.
Her argument is methodologically diverse, based on a formal game-theoretic model of the decision to use mandate claims to seek a policy change, a statistical analysis of those claims since 1828, and theoretically motivated case studies of each presidential election since 1948.
The first chapter of this group, on gradual or big bang reforms and sequencing of gradual reforms, is perhaps the most abstract, couched as it is in game-theoretic terms.