gamma ray

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gamma ray

[′gam·ə ‚rā]
(nuclear physics)
A high-energy photon, especially as emitted by a nucleus in a transition between two energy levels.
References in periodicals archive ?
These exploding stars use all of their energy to emit one last strong beam of highly energetic radiation - known as a gamma-ray burst - before they die.
The explosion, known as a gamma-ray burst and designated GRB 130427A, tops the charts as one of the brightest ever seen.
We thought the visible light for these flashes came from internal shocks, but this burst shows that it must come from the external shock, which produces the most energetic gamma-rays," said Sylvia Zhu, a Fermi team member at the University of Maryland in College Park.
Scientists have known for almost a decade that thunderstorms are capable of generating brief but powerful bursts of gamma-rays called terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, or TGFs.
Gamma-ray astronomy got a big boost in 1991 with the launch of the NASA's now-defunct Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO).
Washington, February 15 ( ANI ): Analysis of data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided the first clear-cut evidence the expanding debris of exploded stars produces some of the fastest-moving matter in the universe.
Or that the telescope had for the first time captured the visible glow of a gamma-ray burst while it was still spewing high-energy radiation.
Washington, January 8 ( ANI ): Using a combination of data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), astronomers have zeroed in on the source of the months-long blast of energy launched by an enormous black hole almost 11 billion years ago swept past Earth in 2011.
WASHINGTON, April 6 /PRNewswire/ -- Scientists at NASA and the University of Kansas say that a mass extinction on Earth hundreds of millions of years ago could have been triggered by a star explosion called a gamma-ray burst.
SGR 1900+14 and SGR 0526-66 belong to a class of stars known as soft gamma-ray repeaters because they sporadically emit low-energy gamma rays.
Gamma-rays are electromagnetic radiation emitted during radioactive decay or other high-energy particle processes.
Using infrared telescopes, which can detect galaxies hidden by dust, they surveyed small patches of sky around the locations of several bright gamma-rays bursts.