Ganesa


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Ganesa

(gənā`sə), b. 1507, d. after 1564, Indian astronomer. As a boy of 13 in a village N of Mumbai, Ganesa wrote a treatise on astronomy, the Grahalaghava, which has often been reprinted and which has inspired many commentaries. In 1525 he composed a book of lunar tables that was also widely studied. His other works on astronomy, astrology, and Hindu law are less familiar.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grimes approaches this insight from a philosophic point of view: "Ganesa lore in particular, and the Mudgala Purana specifically, affirms that Ganesa is a physical embodiment of two seemingly incongruous parts.
Recent pata paintings show the goddess seated on a lotus flower with Ganesa on her lap instead of showing her swallowing an elephant, and the song says that Dhanapati misread the vision of the goddess kissing her elephant headed son, Ganesa, and thought she was swallowing him instead (Singh 1995).
This pada reinforces the impression given by the previous one, especially with its reference to Ganesa puja in the exclusively Krsna temple, adding the apparently insulting Maliyagorila (see n.
the support given to the Ganesa cult by the wealthy Brahman Moraya Gosavi; the dates of the oldest available manuscripts; and translations of the text in Marathi and Tamil.
The NKNP suggests to begin this festival by worshipping Ganesa on the first day, Kachalaga (Kartik) Dvadasi, making it a six-day festival (A.
In addition, these volumes will add much rich information to any study of the major deities herein presented: a whole study of the forms of Ganesa (which Buhnemann has focused on elsewhere) and Siva could be done on the basis of these texts.
Chapter three, "Fusion of Two Bodies," gathers examples of Ardhanarisvara and Harihara where two different bodies are fused into one unique body, and also examples of addorsed bodies (or heads) of Yaksas, Kuvera, Scythian males, Ganesa, and Buddha/Bodhisattva icons.
They are led by Bhairava and Ganesa and escorted by Simhini/Simha ('lioness') and Vyangini/Dumha ('tigress'), the latter two acting as guardians and occasional fun-makers within the gana.
Ganesa Sastri Gokhale) (Poona, 1915) are taken up with this discussion.
The religious book, swasthani brata katha, describes that the goddess Parvati created a boy Ganesa, out of the dust of face washing powder, komkhi.
On the back of the wall behind are figures of a Ganesa, a Karttikeya and a Sivalinga fixed in a yoni or jalahari, meaning a circle of stone with a hole at the centre.