rotten

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rotten

1. affected with rot; decomposing, decaying, or putrid
2. (of rocks, soils, etc.) soft and crumbling, esp as a result of weathering
References in periodicals archive ?
Visitors to the Museum will be thrilled to find themselves face to face with the gaping maw of the second largest T.
Admittedly, all-news networks have a gaping maw to fill each day.
Or I can walk away, let the work sink into the void, that vast "garbage heap" of all that is unknown and forgotten- that gaping maw into which all celebrated enterprises eventually follow, albeit at a somewhat slower pace.
Could the surgeon who operates on Anthea Turner's knee be persuaded to put two or three dozen stitches in that gaping maw in her face?
We have apparently not finished, either and the next generation will be obliged to produce even more moolah to throw into the gaping maw of these appalling organisations before the shackles are finally hammered off in 2047 or whenever.
Looking down into the gaping maw, I couldn't see any teeth, just huge lips and a massive tongue.
This begins with animal-man symbioses, like a Hundemensch (Dog-man) walking upright, with a human face and hanging, floppy ears, and continues with the Mausekind (Mouse-child), a mouse that carries a rotund child's face within its gaping maw.
2--Color) Frank De La Cruz of Artkraft peers through the gaping maw of a hippo at the Valley's last shop dedicated solely to taxidermy.
In Paul Myoda's recent show, gawky, faux-rock sculptures snaked along the walls or dangled from the ceiling; one, with gaping maw, remained rooted to the floor.
Alongside the gaping maw is a pterosaur skeleton cast in its entirety and thoughtfully anchored into its natural posture by a sculpted wall.
No, we are talking about the uptight Skinny Minnies who diet because of a misguided notion that they appear fashionable and gorgeous and about the bloaters who cram doughnuts into their gaping maws because they are gluttons and have no self-control.
In Jerry Bruckheimer's Pearl Harbor, we are transported back to a simpler time, when Hollywood could glorify war with an untroubled conscience and combat films showed young men and women marching bravely, even happily, into war's gaping maws.