garden

(redirected from Garden Lupin)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

garden,

land set aside for the cultivation of flowers, herbs, vegetables, or small fruits, for either utility or ornament. Gardens range in size from window boxes and small dooryard plots to the public botanical gardenbotanical garden,
public place in which plants are grown both for display and for scientific study. An arboretum is a botanical garden devoted chiefly to the growing of woody plants.
..... Click the link for more information.
 and commercial truck garden (see truck farmingtruck farming,
horticultural practice of growing one or more vegetable crops on a large scale for shipment to distant markets. It is usually less intensive and diversified than market gardening. At first this type of farming depended entirely on local or regional markets.
..... Click the link for more information.
). Garden types are also widely varied: a garden may be devoted entirely to one kind of plant—e.g., cactuses, aquatic plants, alpine plants (see rock gardenrock garden,
garden planned around natural rock formations or rocks artificially arranged to simulate natural (often mountainous) conditions. The concept of rock gardens is believed to have been introduced from China and Japan into the Western world in the 17th cent.
..... Click the link for more information.
), or herbs—or may combine many types of plants to achieve maximum beauty and productivity.

Landscape and Ornamental Gardening

In landscape gardening an overall aesthetic effect is sought, usually to enhance dwellings, public buildings, and monuments and to integrate and beautify parks, playgrounds, and fairgrounds. Formal landscaping involves artificial modifications of the terrain and emphasizes balanced plantings and geometrical design; the naturalistic style incorporates plantings with the natural scenery.

Ornamental gardening and landscape gardening are ancient arts. The Egyptians built formal walled gardens, and the Mesopotamians constructed private parks and terraced gardens—usually on artificial mounds or supported by columns, as the Hanging Gardens of Babylon. The Persians were especially skilled in using water for decorative effects; the Moors carried Middle Eastern styles to Spain. In the East the planting of sacred groves was spread by the Buddhists from India to China and set a style there for naturalistic gardens, in which the beauty of the natural scenery was accentuated by distributing plants so as to allow them free growth and set off their colors and fragrances to best advantage. The Japanese adopted this principle and elaborated it into a distinct style of highly disciplined arrangements of plants and their settings with the object of achieving subtle beauty based on economy and simplicity. The Japanese art of bonsaibonsai
, art of cultivating dwarf trees. Bonsai, developed by the Japanese more than a thousand years ago, is derived from the Chinese practice of growing miniature plants.
..... Click the link for more information.
 gave rise to the unique miniature gardens and dish gardens.

In Europe landscape gardening was highly developed under the Roman Empire; formal gardens, often terraced and adorned with statuary and fountains, were designed by architects. The Crusaders brought back from the East new gardening techniques that gave great impetus to horticulture in Western Europe. During the Renaissance the classical style was revived in Italy; the Italian gardens, planned by leading artists, sometimes went to extremes of formality and decor, among them those employing elaborate waterworks displays (see fountainfountain,
natural or artificially conveyed flow of water. In ancient Greece columnar shrines were built over springs and dedicated to deities or nymphs. In ancient Rome fountains fed by the great aqueduct system furnished water in the streets, in the villa gardens, and in town
..... Click the link for more information.
). The Italian style was widely imitated. In Spain the Italian influence was modified by Moorish features. In turn, the Spaniards and the Portuguese introduced their ideas in the Americas, where these techniques were combined with the already well-developed Aztec and Inca traditions. The Dutch, famous for the development of the nurserynursery,
in horticulture, an establishment or area for the propagation, breeding, and early cultivation of plants. In North America the term nursery originally specified a place where hardy woody plants, especially fruit trees, were started; but as the market for and
..... Click the link for more information.
, were noted also for their topiary worktopiary work
, pruning and training of shrubs and trees into ornamental shapes, used in landscape gardening. Elaborate topiary work in which trees and shrubs are clipped to resemble statuary (e.g.
..... Click the link for more information.
, an art practiced earlier by the Romans. France became the leader in formal landscaping; the work of André Le NôtreLe Nôtre, André
, 1613–1700, the most famous landscape architect in French history, b. near the Tuileries; studied drawing with Simon Vouet at the Louvre.
..... Click the link for more information.
 is exemplified in the gardens of Versailles. In the 18th cent. England inaugurated a revival of the naturalistic trend under such leaders as William KentKent, William,
1685–1748, English landscape gardener, architect, and painter. A minor painter, Kent made ceiling decorations for Kensington Palace. He greatly influenced landscape gardening by changing the prevailing artificial style to one based more closely on nature, as
..... Click the link for more information.
, Capability BrownBrown, Capability
(Lancelot Brown), 1715–83, English landscape gardener, b. Kirkharle, Northumberland. The leading landscape gardener of his time, he is known for designing gardens that broke with the French formal tradition.
..... Click the link for more information.
, and Humphrey Repton.

The 19th cent. brought a partial reversion to formal landscaping and an interest in horticulturehorticulture
[Lat. hortus=garden], science and art of gardening and of cultivating fruits, vegetables, flowers, and ornamental plants. Horticulture generally refers to small-scale gardening, and agriculture to the growing of field crops, usually on a large scale, although
..... Click the link for more information.
 as well as in design. American landscape artists generally followed the example of the English masters. Landscaping, especially of public parks and buildings, was stimulated by the work of A. J. DowningDowning, Andrew Jackson,
1815–52, American horticulturist, rural architect, and landscape gardener, b. Newburgh, N.Y. With his brother Charles Downing, 1802–85, he took over the operation of the nursery that his father had established at Newburgh, and c.
..... Click the link for more information.
, Calvert VauxVaux, Calvert
, 1824–95, American landscape architect, b. London. He emigrated (1850) to the United States, and assisted A. J. Downing with the U.S. Capitol grounds and a number of Hudson River estates.
..... Click the link for more information.
, and F. L. OlmstedOlmsted, Frederick Law,
1822–1903, American landscape architect and writer, b. Hartford, Conn. Although his Walks and Talks of an American Farmer in England
..... Click the link for more information.
 and his son. Today landscape gardening stresses practical as well as aesthetic design, selecting from a wealth of gardening traditions and emphasizing casual, naturalistic effects.

Vegetable Gardening

Vegetable, herb, and fruit growing (see orchardorchard,
generally an area on which fruit or nut trees are planted and cultivated. The words grove and plantation are often used when the fruits are tropical, e.g., a "citrus grove" or a "banana plantation.
..... Click the link for more information.
 and vineyardvineyard,
land on which cultivation of the grape—known as viticulture—takes place. As many as 40 varieties of grape, Vitis vinifera, are known. The few that grow wild are generally not used; all domesticated varieties require careful cultivation to produce
..... Click the link for more information.
) have become more the province of large-scale agriculture as advanced marketing techniques have threatened the family farm. Home vegetable gardening provided a major source of food during the emergency conditions of both world wars, however, and has been a popular hobby ever since.

See also garden citygarden city,
an ideal, self-contained community of predetermined area and population surrounded by a greenbelt. As formulated by Sir Ebenezer Howard, the garden city was intended to bring together the economic and cultural advantages of both city and country living, with land
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Bibliography

See E. Hyams, A History of Gardens and Gardening (1971); D. Wyman, Wyman's Gardening Encyclopedia (new exp. 2d ed. 1986); P. Thompson, Creative Propagation: A Grower's Guide (1989); F. G. Barth Insects and Flowers: The Biology of a Partnership (1991); C. T. Erler, The Garden Problem Solver (1994); J. E. Ingels, Ornamental Horticulture (1994); B. J. Barton, Gardening by Mail (5th ed. 1997); E. Clarke, Three Seasons of Summer: Gardening with Annuals and Biennials (1999); G. Rice, Discovering Annuals (1999); S. Harris, Planting Paradise: Cultivating the Garden, 1501–1900 (2011); M. and V. Vercelloni, Inventing the Garden (2011).

Garden

A piece of ground, open or enclosed, appropriated to plants, trees, shrubs, or other landscape features.

What does it mean when you dream about a garden?

A beautiful garden in glorious bloom is said to represent the psyche and the growth of the soul; the transition from earthly realms to heavenly planes, and peace and harmony. A sparse, weed-infested garden suggests that the spiritual needs of the dreamer should be tended.

garden

A plot of ground used principally for growing vegetables, fruits, or flowering and/or ornamental plants.

garden

1. Brit
a. an area of land, usually planted with grass, trees, flowerbeds, etc., adjoining a house
b. (as modifier): a garden chair
2. 
a. an area of land used for the cultivation of ornamental plants, herbs, fruit, vegetables, trees, etc.
b. (as modifier): garden tools
3. such an area of land that is open to the public, sometimes part of a park
www.garden.org
www.gardenadvice.co.uk
www.uk.gardenweb.com
www.ngs.org.uk
www.greenfingers.com
www.bbc.co.uk/gardening
www.abc.net.au/gardening
www.bestgardening.co.nz/bgc/default.htm
www.canadiangardening.com/home.shtml
www.global-garden.com.au

Garden

(dreams)
It may be a symbol of lost innocence or youth. Folklore tells us that dreaming of beautiful gardens is symbolic of great happiness and love. If the garden is wild, it means that you may have difficulties but with some care and attention you are capable of overcoming them.