Gargantua


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Gargantua

royal giant who required 17,913 cows for personal milk supply. [Fr. Lit.: Gargantua and Pantagruel]

Gargantua

enormous eater who ate salad lettuces as big as walnut trees. [Fr. Lit.: Brewer Handbook, 406]
References in periodicals archive ?
The principal character of Rabelais's great satire Gargantua and Pantagruel.
Experts are unable to agree on his date of birth or on the date of publication of Gargantua, let alone on the meaning of his book.
In broad terms, Tournon sees Pantagruel and Gargantua as representing respectively the ludic and didactic elements identified by traditional Rabelaisian criticism, while the Quart Livre bears obvious scars of the theological and political controversies into which Rabelais had been drawn.
Sp, " gullet " ) The name of a giant - hero in medieval folk literature, whom Rabelais made the father of Pantagruel in his satire Gargantua and Pantagruel.
For example, her chapter on para-Rabelaisian material, her chapter on the chapbook giant pre-history of Rabelais's Gargantua, and her brief "interlude" chapter on Panourgia in England supply not only valuable information about the English vicissitudes of Rabelaisian characters, but also include discussions of the way these characters, or the materials that served as their building blocks, circulated informally in early modern Europe prior to and simultaneously with the great encyclopedic French oeuvre, thus demonstrating the extent to which Rabelais himself was a marvelous collector and compiler.
The authors' readings of individual episodes frequently appear debatable: not necessarily wrong, but certainly needing fuller discussion, as when they ascribe to Gargantua (Tiers Livre, Chapter 48) the view that if a daughter marries clandestinely, her father is entitled to kill not only the husband but her too (p.
Les Horribles et Espovantables Faictz et prouesses du tres renomme Pantagruel, Roy des Dipsodes, fils du grant g eant Gargantua (1532), later known as Book II, recounts the life of Pantagruel up to the war against the Dipsodes in Utopia.
The two chapters on Rabelais present two phases: early optimism in Pantagruel and Gargantua, then growing skepticism and an abandonment of earlier hopes, in the Quart livre.
With this new edition of Gargantua, Gray lays further claim to our gratitude by publishing a remarkably faithful transcription of Rabelais's text at a particularly interesting stage of its evolution, representing as it does the very last version that Rabelais may have had occasion to revise and correct before its publication.
Thus, for Pantagruel, he reacts to Duval, Defaux, and Screech; for Gargantua, to Screech and Schwartz; for the Tiers Livre, the above plus Ceard and Baraz; for the Quart Livre, Marichal, Paul Smith, and Saulnier are added.
Wes Williams's insightful essay considers the metamorphosis of pilgrimage accounts into travel narratives, using the pilgrim episode of Gargantua as a reference point.
Wilhelm Kuhlmann's article), or as literary fiction, like the "L'Abbaye de Theleme" in Rabelais's Gargantua et Pantagruel (cf.