Gargantua and Pantagruel


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Gargantua and Pantagruel

Rabelais’s farcical and obscene 16th-century novel. [Fr. Lit.: Magill I, 298]
References in periodicals archive ?
lnterestingly, Rabelais's Gargantua and Pantagruel also tells of sounds which are frozen and then melted.
Borrowing from Homer's account of Odysseus's journey to the underworld in Odyssey 11, Dionysus's crossing of the Styx in Aristophanes' Frogs, and the lost Nekuja of Menippus, Lucian wrote thirty short Dialogues of the Dead, his Menipp us, and The Downward Journey The debt of Renaissance writers to these dialogues is extensive and includes Alberti's The Deceased, Matteo Vegio's Palinurus, and the most celebrated Renaissance Lucianic imitation, Rabelais's Histories of Gargantua and Pantagruel, in which Homeric heroes are reduced to rustic laborers.
In the introduction to Gargantua and Pantagruel (1534), Rabelais writes that "Praising his teacher," Symposium's Alcibiades calls Socrates,
The Baldus took an exciting epic quest as frame and crammed into it a staggering hodgepodge of characters, literary styles, and humanist concerns, creating an indescribable literary jumble that has much in common with Gargantua and Pantagruel.