Garnet star

Garnet star

(μ Cep) A red supergiant in the constellation Cepheus. It is a semiregular variable with a magnitude that ranges from 3.6 to 5.1 although it is usually about 4.5. It is also a triple star. Spectral type: M2 Ia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Herschel's Garnet Star (4th-magnitude Mu Cephei) is at top.
It is also home to two important variable stars; delta Cephei, prototype of the Cepheid variables, and mu Cephei, the semi-regular Garnet Star named by Sir William Herschel and one of the reddest naked eye stars in the sky (although this is totally lost on the colour-blind Director).
Modest telescopic aid shows the color well (it varies with the star's varying brightness) and proves that Mu deserves its famous title: Herschel's Garnet Star.
Today, Mu Cephei is often called Herschel's Garnet Star.
Betelgeuse and Herrschel's Garnet Star (Mu Cephei) are examples of variables that are also strongly colored.
It is located just east of the 4th-magnitude star Mu Cephei, Herschel's Garnet Star, which appears at lower left.
It also passes over Mu ([mu]) Cephei, popularly called Herschel's Garnet Star for its deep color, and the star cluster Messier 39, which is nowadays neglected but was familiar to ancient observers.
Mu is known as Herschel's Garnet Star owing to its distinctive orange color.
This dynamic nebulous complex is located about 1 1/2[degrees] south and slightly west of Mu ([mu]) Cephei--Herschel's famous Garnet Star.
If you know "Mu Cephei" as the Garnet Star you're all set, but you won't find it under "M"; and the "helium flash" entry doesn't inform you that the book also discusses "final helium flash" or that you should look up "Sakurai's object" to learn about the only example of the latter phenomenon that astronomers have had the opportunity to study since the advent of electronic light detectors.