Garret


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garret

[′gar·ət]
(building construction)
The part of a house just under the roof.

Garret

A room or space located just beneath the roof of a house usually with sloping ceilings; sometimes called an attic.

garret

1. Space within a roof structure; sometimes called an attic.
2. A room, usually with sloping ceilings, just beneath the roof of a house.
References in classic literature ?
Four bed-rooms and two garrets formed the rest of the house.
The garret, built to be a depository for firewood and the like, was dim and dark: for, the window of dormer shape, was in truth a door in the roof, with a little crane over it for the hoisting up of stores from the street: unglazed, and closing up the middle in two pieces, like any other door of French construction.
They finished their supper, the cloth was removed, and while the hostess, her daughter, and Maritornes were getting Don Quixote of La Mancha's garret ready, in which it was arranged that the women were to be quartered by themselves for the night, Don Fernando begged the captive to tell them the story of his life, for it could not fail to be strange and interesting, to judge by the hints he had let fall on his arrival in company with Zoraida.
He begun its inspection without delay, scouring it from cellar to garret.
To-morrow morning I will begin with the garret, nor desist till I have torn the house down
He therefore ordered it to be put away in the garret.
The resolutions of these as sembiages appeared in the most conspicuous columns of a little blue-looking newspaper, that was already issued weekly from the garret of a dwelling-house in the village, and which the traveller might as often see stuck into the fissure of a stake, erected at the point where the footpath from the log-cabin of some settler entered the highway, as a post-office for an individual.
At ten years' purchase, my dear Raoul; a superb affair, I bought the house for thirty thousand livres; it has a garden which opens to the Rue de la Mortillerie; the cabaret lets for a thousand livres, with the first story; the garret, or second floor, for five hundred livres.
When the painter and Ginevra thought themselves alone, Servin rapped in a peculiar manner on the door of the dark garret, which turned at once on its rusty and creaking hinges.
There was no garret at all, and no cellar--except a small hole dug in the ground, called a cyclone cellar, where the family could go in case one of those great whirlwinds arose, mighty enough to crush any building in its path.
Ever since the habitations of men were reared two stories high has the garret been the nursery of genius.
Voyez-vous, Monsieur, to be able to look life in the face: that's worth living in a garret for, isn't it?