Garrison Duty


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Related to Garrison Duty: defray, brusque

Garrison Duty

 

a type of military duty organized in each garrison to maintain high military discipline among garrison personnel and to carry out garrison activities, such as troop parades, honor guards, military funerals, the enlistment of troops for fighting fires and natural disasters, and troop participation in demonstrations and meetings. Garrison duties within a military district are controlled by the troop commander of the district and within a garrison by the garrison commander. Garrison duty is carried out by all military units located in the garrison.

S. E. STREMBITSKII

References in periodicals archive ?
The same General Order allowed only six wives to accompany each Company on field service and that when a Royal Veteran Battalion embarked for foreign garrison duty all the wives `of good character' could accompany their husbands.
All units, while in a defensive perimeter, send out security patrols, which directly relates to what happens during garrison duty.
Fabrizio's reply is that there is not enough peacetime activity, such as garrison duty, to keep the troops occupied.
They were joined by a second body of settlers in 1783-84, comprised primarily of disbanded soldiers whose Highland regiments had been on garrison duty in Halifax or Quebec or had been fighting in the American colonies.
As a junior officer, he served garrison duty in Ireland and saw combat in Europe during the War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748).
They will be able to generate additional brigade-sized forces for enduring operations as well as fulfilling the Army's standing commitments such as garrison duty in the Falklands, Cyprus and Brunei.
Action was not regarded as imminent and the soldiers were trained for garrison duty, not combat.
The French army went to war in 1914 wearing brightly coloured uniforms (the famous pantalons rouges) more appropriate to colonial garrison duty than the modern battlefield.
And this is what it would have looked like 2,000 years ago when it was used by a Roman soldier on garrison duty in Britain.
Most were Spanish, Gallic and German soldiers, while several of the auxiliary units who took over garrison duty from the legionaries came from north Africa.
It's safe to say that in the battle against boredom--the bane of any routine garrison duty such as life in camp Kandahar--the military is sparing no expense.