Sobers

(redirected from Gary Sobers)
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Sobers

Sir Garfield St. Auburn, known as Garry. born 1936, West Indian (Barbadian) cricketer; one of the finest all-rounders of all time
References in periodicals archive ?
Sachin Tendulkar joins Brian Lara, Clive Lloyd and Gary Sobers as the non- Australian cricketers to be conferred with the award
London, Oct 11 ( ANI ): The cricket ball used in a match where West Indies legend Sir Gary Sobers hit six sixes in one over is to go on sale.
The pitch is famous for being the spot where West Indies sporting legend Gary Sobers hit six sixes in one over in 1968.
It was not uncommon in those days as Gundappa Viswanath and Gary Sobers recalled opponent batsmen despite the umpires giving them out.
Excluding players like Gary Sobers, the greatest all rounder the game had ever produced and Sri Lankan spinner Muralitharan the highest wicket taker in Test history, only proves that those who voted had no idea about the greats who walked on cricket fields in the past.
Tendulkar is a modern great, who sits happily in the company of Shane Warne, Sir Viv Richards, Sir Gary Sobers, Ken Barrington and Don Bradman as the game's all-time great players and I'm thrilled for him that he now has a World Cup winner's medal.
Muhammad Ali, Wilma Rudolf, Pele and Gary Sobers in the 60s and 70s and later Carl Lewis, Bjorn Borg and Diego Maradona carried on the trend be it rain or shine.
GARY Sobers hit a record 365 not out for the West Indies in their third Test against Pakistan in the Caribbean.
Gary Sobers and Ravi Shastri are the only top-level players to have achieved the feat and it took some of the attention away from a disappointing batting performance from England in their opening game against New Zealand.
And a year before that a buyer paid pounds 54,257 for the bat Sir Gary Sobers used to hit six sixes in one over in 1968.
Gary Sobers hitting six sixes in one over for Nottingham against Glamorgan in 1968, Pat Cash's 1987 Wimbledon win, Steve Ovett and Sebastian Coe's head-to-head in the 800m at the 1980 Moscow Olympics.
Perhaps the saddest picture in this well produced book is a photograph of Ian Smith and Gary Sobers, the West Indian cricketer, sitting peacefully and relaxed side by side enjoying that invisible cement of Empire, sport.