Gassendi


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Gassendi

(ga-sen -dee) See table at craters.
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Pierre Gassendi, too, was an admirer of Lucretius, as well as an acquaintance of Hobbes, and Locke and Jefferson were enthusiasts for his writing.
42) A representative expression of the mechanist program is found in Gassendi's statement that "there is no effect without a cause; no cause acts without motion; nothing acts on distant things except through itself or an organ of connection or transmission; nothing moves unless it is touched, whether directly or through an organ or another body" (Pierre Gassendi, Opera Omnia, 6 vols.
Descartes' response to Gassendi (and presumably what would have been his response to Hume) is that our idea of imperfection depends upon our idea of perfection (rather than the converse, which Gassendi asserted).
Moliere, the French playwright and student of Gassendi, spread the Epicurean world view to the larger culture.
Notes: Named for Pierre Gassendi, 17th century astronomer.
Giordano Bruno, Galileo, Pierre Gassendi, Thomas Hobbes, and Rene Descartes were all key contributors.
In summoning the phrase sapere aude, Kant may have been motivated by Pierre Gassendi, who, a century earlier, had already refitted Horace's admonition to express a modern appeal for free inquiry.
58), Spenser and Donne none at all, though their Lucretianism is beyond doubt (Greenlaw 1920; Hirsch 1991; Passannante 2008); Montaigne is given pride of place; then a quick sprint through Pierre Gassendi, who reconciled atomism with Christianity in the 1640s, Lucy Hutchinson, Isaac Newton and Erasmus Darwin leads us to Thomas Jefferson's 1820 confession that "I am an Epicurean" (263).
En 1473, con la publicacion del libro de Lucrecio De rerum natura, el atomismo renace a los vientos, y empieza a circular distintos senderos, como los que trazaron Giordano Bruno, Galileo, Hariot, Bacon, Hobbes, Gassendi, Maignan, Cyrano de Bergerac (32), Beeckman, etc.
Though Stenger paints an overall negative picture of Christianity he does praise one theist and scientist, Pierre Gassendi, who lived in the latter part of the seventeenth century.
After criticizing those that "seek to collect (antiquities) so that they may be known to possess them," Gassendi, when writing about Peirisc's life, adds : "those who are entirely worthy of praise and who are not wasting their time in seeking out antiquities, are those who study and publish them to throw light on noble authors, to help illustrate history's circumstances" (Gassendi 1641: 235).