Gassendi


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Gassendi

(ga-sen -dee) See table at craters.
References in classic literature ?
I then desired the governor to call up Descartes and Gassendi, with whom I prevailed to explain their systems to Aristotle.
Father Pierre Gassendi (1592-1655), philosopher, mathematician, and astronomer, produced a Christianized atomism that allowed for the spirit of God, and the human rational soul.
Notes: Named for Pierre Gassendi, 17th century astronomer.
Giordano Bruno, Galileo, Pierre Gassendi, Thomas Hobbes, and Rene Descartes were all key contributors.
Although Hale turned away from his early Calvinism later in life, he resisted the other major seventeenth-century intellectual shift, the new mechanical philosophy associated with Rene Descartes (1596-1650), Pierre Gassendi (1592-1655), and Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679).
Perhaps that is just as well, for his early lunar observations included the 'discovery' of trees and forests of gigantic proportions in the vicinity of Gassendi and the Mare Humorum (Figure 3), (5) as well as other indications of lunar life, including intelligent life which Herschel considered to be 'a great probability, not to say almost absolute certainty'.
Hobbes who, following Gassendi, construes the understanding in terms of the corporeal imagination).
The possibility that Gassendi is here imagining has come to be called "the problem of inverted qualia" (or, "spectrum inversion") and it finds its most famous expression in Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding, published 65 years later.
1625-1688) made contributions as a travel writer on Mughal India, and an influential member of the Gassendi circle.
Newton's closest friend, perhaps best known for insisting that governments are bound by social contract to protect their citizens' "natural rights," including life, liberty, and private property, John Locke, the author argues, "had come to philosophy through science rather than the other way round, learning medicine, chemistry, and astronomy before encountering the likes of Descartes and Pierre Gassendi.
In her introduction, Sarasohn (history, Oregon State University) admits that her interest in Margaret Cavendish, seventeenth century philosopher and writer, grew out of a 1984 study she made of the male scientific philosopher, Pierre Gassendi.
He uses that date as a starting point as he traces the development of natural philosophy from the Scholasticism of the early thirteenth century, through the corpuscularism and atomism associated with Gassendi and Mersenne to Descartes' cosmology and to Hobbes's mechanism.