GATT

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GATT

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade: a multilateral international treaty signed in 1947 to promote trade, esp by means of the reduction and elimination of tariffs and import quotas; replaced in 1995 by the World Trade Organization
References in periodicals archive ?
Gatting further said that the part of the reason Cook had been so good as a captain was because he had led from the front with the bat and had made sure his performance was as good as it could be.
Gatting was confident that England could attain the number one ranking in all three formats of the game if they continue performing consistently.
After 10 minutes Gatting left the playing area to be joined a quarter of an hour later by the bewildered players, and the negotiations started in earnest.
Consistency has been missing in England's play across all forms of the game for some time and Gatting believes it is something they must develop if they are to remain at the top of the world game, with the Ashes series in Australia beginning at the end of the year.
The Test and Country Cricket Board ordered Gatting to apologise and play resumed on the fourth day.
Otherwise Gatting could have mistaken them for M&Ms and we would have had to wait about 24 hours for Gatt's gut to digest the draw.
Gatting picked out Marcus Trescothick, who put together a solid 59 in the first Test, as one of England's danger men with Steve Harmison and Anthony McGrath the men to watch with the ball in hand as their Test careers progress.
Bitter rows followed and six hours of playing time was lost before Gatting was ordered to write an unconditional apology, with his team-mates reacting by issuing a statement protesting at the Test and County Cricket Board's instruction.
However, Gatting admitted that corruption cannot be stopped unless cricketers become aware of their responsibilities of what they should do if they approached with illegal requests, adding that it is to be hoped that a solution is found to stop players from accepting illegal cash for once and for all.
Gatting is confident that Strauss will be able to cope with the pressure thrust upon him, though, and has told Johnson he will be wasting his time by peppering the England captain with bouncers.
Gatting said no repeat will be tolerated of the petulance that saw Sheriyar confront the umpires on that final day.