Gatún Lake

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Gatún Lake

(gäto͞on`), artificial lake, 163 sq mi (422 sq km), Colón Prov., Panama, formed by the impounding of the Chagres River. Gatún Dam (completed 1912), 1 1-2 mi (2.4 km) long and 115 ft (35 m) high, controls the level of the lake (c.85 ft/26 m above sea level), which is part of the canal route. Barro Colorado Island, high ground to which animals fled as the basin slowly filled, is a wildlife sanctuary. The lower Chagres valley, now submerged, was first selected as a transisthmian route (for a railroad) in 1848 by John Lloyd Stephens, the American author and traveler.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the old gates, all the freshwater, which comes from Gatun Lake, is flushed out during the locking process.
CANAL FACTS CANAL FACTS | A TRANSIT uses 52 million gallons of water from Gatun Lake, which is replaced by rainfall.
As the Legend exited the upper chamber, she headed out into Gatun Lake which was very much the Americans' brilliant engineering solution.
On the Atlantic side, they dug a canal (a ditch as wide and deep as a river) to bring ships close to Gatun Lake.
Movements of juvenile American crocodiles in Gatun Lake, Panama.
The Island Princess will sail on a 10-day roundtrip itinerary from Fort Lauderdale, which offers a partial Panama Canal transit to Gatun Lake followed by a call in Colon, plus calls in the Caribbean ports of Aruba; Cartagena; Limon, Costa Rica; and Grand Cayman or Ocho Rios.
After the valley had flooded and water rose to full pool, Gatun Lake became the largest manmade lake in the world at about 165 square miles.
The locks operate as water lifts to elevate ships 85 feet above sea level to that of Gatun Lake, which is roughly half-way through the canal.
We studied Greater Anis in 2007 and 2008 at Gatun Lake, Panama, an artificial reservoir formed in 1914 when the Chagres River was dammed to create the Panama Canal.
The dam's collapse sent water rushing from Gatun Lake into the canal, the culmination of a mammoth, decade-long construction project.
Yet onwards we sped - down the Chagres River and into the Gatun Lake, which feeds that marvel of engineering joining North and South America: the Panama Canal.