Gaudete Sunday


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Gaudete Sunday

In the Roman Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion the third Sunday in Advent is sometimes called Gaudete Sunday. Gaudete means "rejoice" in Latin. This name comes from the first line of the introit (opening prayer) for the third Sunday in Advent, which encourages parishioners to "rejoice in the Lord always." Although Advent ushers in a period of penance and spiritual preparation, Gaudete Sunday introduces the theme of joy. The lighter mood is reflected in the change in liturgical colors, from the purple of the Advent season to the rose color adopted for Gaudete Sunday. In addition, on Gaudete Sunday parishioners may decorate the church with flowers, and the organ, usually silent during Advent, may be played.

Further Reading

Metford, J. C. J. The Christian Year. London, England: Thames and Hudson, 1991.
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I am writing this editorial in the third week of Advent, just after Gaudete Sunday.
Each of the sacred texts for this Gaudete Sunday calls forth our joy.
Among the nearly 200 topics covered are Advent, Baboushka, Berchta, Black Peter, Candlemas, Cherry Tree, Christkindel, Epiphany, Frankincense, Gaudete Sunday, Glastonbury Thorn, King Herod, Ivy, Jesse Tree, Knocking Nights, Magi, Mistletoe, Nativity Scene, Peace of Christmas, Poinsettia, Reveillon, St.