Gaudí, Antonio

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Gaudí, Antonio

(1852–1926)
One of the most original architectural talents, inspired by Islamic and Gothic sources, whose work is mainly found in Barcelona. Casa Vicens, 1878, was his first work, a suburban house decorated with polychrome tiles and sinuous ironwork. The commission for La Sagrada Familia Church, 1884, with completed transept facades, with its extraordinary ceramic-covered spires, is his most fantastic work. The Palacio Guell, 1885, is dominated by a pair of parabolic arches at the entrance and topped by chimneys encrusted with colored tiles. Casa Batlo, 1906, has a unique tile roof and tile facade, and Casa Mila, 1910, has an undulating facade and huge ceramic-covered chimney pots on the roof. Park Guell, 1914, is a playful open space surrounded by undulating and tile-encrusted benches along with fanciful gatehouses with imaginative use of rock and tile.

Gaudí, Antonio

 

(full name, Antonio Gaudí y Cornet). Born June 26, 1852, in Reus, near Tarragona; died June 10, 1926, in Barcelona. Spanish architect.

Gaudí lived in Barcelona from 1868 and studied at the Higher Technical School of Architecture. In the fanciful structures designed by Gaudí (mainly in Barcelona)—for example, in the Sagrada Familia Church (1884-1926), which endows the composition of a Gothic cathedral with a mystical spirit, and in houses in the art-nouveau style (Casa Batlló, 1905-07; Casa Milá, 1905-10)—the boldly curved volumes and architectural innovations (parabolic arches, inclined supports, lightened vaults) create an effect of fantastic curvilinear forms that appear to have been molded by hand.

REFERENCE

Sweeney, J. J., and J. L. Sert. Antonio Gaudi. New York, 1960.