Gaugamela


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Gaugamela

 

a hill (modern name, Tell Gōmel) and settlement (near modern Gōmel-sū) in Mesopotamia, northwest of the city of Arbela. On Oct. 1, 331 B.C., a decisive battle took place near Gaugamela between Alexander of Macedonia (40,000 infantry, 7,000 cavalry) and the Persian king Darius III Codomannus (60,000-80,000 infantry, up to 15,000 cavalry, 200 war chariots, and 15 battle elephants). Smashing the Persians’ covering force on the Euphrates River, Alexander moved toward Gaugamela, where the Persian army had taken position. The Persians attacked both flanks of the Macedonians and broke through their left flank to the camp, where the Macedonian infantry stopped them. Alexander struck a decisive blow to the left wing of the Persian army with the right flank of his army, consisting mainly of crack cavalry. He smashed the Persian left wing and broke through to the rear of the attacking Persian right wing. The Persian troops fled, and the Macedonian cavalry pursued them for 50 km.

References in periodicals archive ?
The second cluster may be demarcated as starting between the battles of the Granicus river and Issus, and continuing up to the success of Gaugamela (17-34).
This resulted in pinpointing exactly where Gaugamela took place.
Along the way you'll fight the key battles, like Issus and Gaugamela, and even have missions where you visit Troy and the Egyptian oracles.
Alexander the Great's breaking of Darius III's large Persian and Greek force at Gaugamela in 331 BC evinces the advantages of a Western tradition of decisiveness rather than ritual maneuvering.
A couple of shots in the midst of battle are brilliant: an aerial shot of Gaugamela where Alexander's 50,000 men defeated a vastly largerPersian army, and a beautifully choreographed stand-off of horse versus elephant.
He wanted to act out a dream, to have a chunk of the glory involved in the filming of Alexander's famous victory at Gaugamela.
But it can be impressive when it hits its stride and the brutal Battle of Gaugamela is stunningly handled and matches the epic battle sequences in Troy.
Stone erred on the side of accuracy when it came to staging the first of the film's two great action sequences, the battle of Gaugamela, in which 47,000 Greeks and Macedonians won the day against 250,000 Persians.
Gaugamela: Viewers will see how the cavalry of Alexander the Great smashed into the quarter-million-strong army of Darius of Persia on the vast battlefield of Gaugamela in 331 BC.
In between the author looks at Gaugamela (331 BC), Cannae (216 BC), Poitiers (732), Tenochtitlan (1521), Lepanto (1571), Rorke's Drift (1879) and Midway (1942).
The battles with Darius III, at Issos and Gaugamela, are also handled with frustrating brevity.
331BC The Battle of Gaugamela saw a decisive victory for the forces of Alexander the Great of Macedonia over Persian ruler Darius III, who was later killed by