Gawain


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Gawain

bravery in the Castle of Wonders. [Arth. Legend: Parsival]
See: Bravery
References in periodicals archive ?
And six years later, Gawain walked down the aisle to meet his soon-to-be wife Lauren, who he'd met all those years ago thanks to Dan.
I propose that reading the end of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight in comparison with the contemporary, optimistic theology expressed by Julian of Norwich will help to reveal the romance also to be optimistic, more a story of felix culpa than culpa mea.
In 2007 an edition of the epic medieval poem Sir Gawain and the Green Knight was published in a glittering new translation by Simon Armitage.
The activities and challenges faced by the knight Sir Gawain are described in great and sometimes graphic detail as the story moves between what the author calls "hunting" and "bedroom" (interior) scenes.
Such ethical implications recur in representations of literal sleep in English literature in the centuries following Ywain and Gawain, as discussed below.
Eelen 2001; Watts 2005; Locher & Watts 2005; Culpeper 2011; Locher 2012), but I would like to point out the key issues that are relevant for my analysis of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.
In the text's final chapter Pickens enters the fray over the missing last chapter of de Troyes' unfinished work, speculating an ending in which Perceval confronts his mirror image, Gawain.
In Sir Gawain and the Green Knight it is specifically stated that the reason why Morgan sent the Green Knight to Arthur's court was to frighten Guinevere.
This translation is, of course, a reissuing of the Sir Gawain and the Green Knight material of Gardner's 1965 edition of The Complete Works of the Gawain Poet.
Citing the triangular relationship among Gawain, Bertilak, and Bertilak's lady, Dinshaw recognizes Gawain's passivity in the bedroom scenes and the lady's aggressiveness, a scenario that, she argues, feminizes Gawain who subsequently kisses his host in imitation of kissing a lady.
Party press officer Gawain Towler apologised to Kiran Randhawa and said he meant no offence by the comment, which he used in a text message to a colleague.
Gawain Towler, who is the PR manager for UK Independence Party (UKIP) leader Nigel Farage, used the phrase in a text referring to journalist Kiran Randhawa, who works in a London-based newspaper.