Aulus Gellius

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Gellius, Aulus

(jĕl`yəs), fl. 2d cent., Roman writer. He was a lawyer who spent at least a year in Athens and wrote Noctes Atticae [Attic nights], a collection of discussions of law, antiquities, and sundry other subjects in 20 books (of which 19 and a fraction survive). The work is chiefly valuable as a storehouse of quotations from lost works.

Aulus Gellius:

see Gellius, AulusGellius, Aulus
, fl. 2d cent., Roman writer. He was a lawyer who spent at least a year in Athens and wrote Noctes Atticae [Attic nights], a collection of discussions of law, antiquities, and sundry other subjects in 20 books (of which 19 and a fraction survive).
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References in classic literature ?
Gellius saith, Hominem delirum, qui verborum minutiis rerum frangit pondera.
Aulus Gellius was a Latin author and grammarian of the second century AD.
This came about when the Roman Aulus Gellius, author of Attic Nights, "coined the term classicus" to label the exemplary authors of antiquity (CT 15).
Then Apollinaris wrote back to Clarus, as being a learned man, very briefly, that the proverb inter os et offam was old, signifying the same as that Greek proverbial verse [then the Greek line above], Gellius 13.
Chrysippus' account of human action in Aulus Gellius, Noctes atticae, 7.
In his letter to Gellius Faber, Menno cited the Anabaptists as the true heirs of Nicaea, because the Nicene article--"I believe in one Holy, Christian Church, the communion of saints, etc.
The Roman law on debt, according to the first-century legal historian, Aulus Gellius, ruled that a debtor unable to pay his bond would be imprisoned for a period of sixty days, after which rime he could be condemned to death and/or his body quartered and distributed among the creditors if they so wished.
My point of departure for this comparison is that Gellius and Apuleius both express themselves through fictionalised 'personal recollections' revolving around the theme of the 'vicissitudes of the intellectual'.
Byzantine scholiast John Tzetzes (in Parsons, 1952) estimated that it contained over 532,800 rolls (including the 42,800 rolls in its nearby sister library, the Sarapeum), and by the mid-first century BCE it is said to have contained over 700,000 rolls (Aulus Gellius, 7.
133) Titus Livius (134) also uses the word "nation" in his famous Ab Urbe condita to refer to nationes Histrorum et Illyiorum, as does Aulus Gellius a century later, in his Attic Nights, (135) along with many other classical authors.
of Oklahoma) has excerpted the collection of observations by ancient Roman nobleman Aulus Gellius to serve as a grammar text for second-year Latin classrooms.
The balance of invention and tradition from the epistle to Arguijo ("ni es bien escribir por terminos tan inauditos") recurs in Lope's criticism of Gongora's excessive obscurity and ambiguity, which is best exemplified by his citation of Aulus Gellius who condemns words that are nova, incognita and inaudita: