Aulus Gellius

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Aulus Gellius:

see Gellius, AulusGellius, Aulus
, fl. 2d cent., Roman writer. He was a lawyer who spent at least a year in Athens and wrote Noctes Atticae [Attic nights], a collection of discussions of law, antiquities, and sundry other subjects in 20 books (of which 19 and a fraction survive).
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Gellius, Aulus

(jĕl`yəs), fl. 2d cent., Roman writer. He was a lawyer who spent at least a year in Athens and wrote Noctes Atticae [Attic nights], a collection of discussions of law, antiquities, and sundry other subjects in 20 books (of which 19 and a fraction survive). The work is chiefly valuable as a storehouse of quotations from lost works.
References in classic literature ?
Gellius saith, Hominem delirum, qui verborum minutiis rerum frangit pondera.
The American critic militates for a little less action and more thought in the Socratic acceptation of the word, invoking the Latin writer Aulus Gellius as authority for defining the word humanitas (Babbitt 1908: 5-6): this does not mean a "promiscuous benevolence" (what the Greeks called "philanthropy"), instead it implies discipline and doctrine, covering in its meaning not man in general, but only a chosen few, its implication being aristocratic, not democratic.
His appearance in Aulus Gellius, however, who praises Peregrinus' moral teaching (Gell.
Aulus Gellius was a Latin author and grammarian of the second century AD.
The volume deals with four Greek authors (Pindar, Aelianus Tacticus, Musaeus, and Agathias) and a Latin one, Aulus Gellius.
Aulus Gellius, in the Nodes atticae, writes: Quo primum tempore a praetoribus Lectus in indices sum, ut iudicia quae appellantur privata susciperem, libros utriusque linguae de officio iudicis scriptos conquisivi, ut homo adulescens a poetarum fabulis eta rhetorum epilogis ad iudicandas lites vocatus rem iudiciariam, quoniam vocis, ut dicitur, vivae penuria erat, ex mutis, quod aiunt, magistris cognoscerem (14.
After that, the Latin grammarian Aulus Gellius translated these terms into naturalis and positivus (two terms from which most European cultures and languages derived the words that Western legal thought uses to describe two kinds of law).
Although this document is mentioned not only by Plutarch, Aulus Gellius, and Cicero, but also with particular precision by Aristotle (Ath.
CAELIVS: Gellius, sibi nomen est Gellius, antiquus amicus tuus.
Then Apollinaris wrote back to Clarus, as being a learned man, very briefly, that the proverb inter os et offam was old, signifying the same as that Greek proverbial verse [then the Greek line above], Gellius 13.
Chrysippus' account of human action in Aulus Gellius, Noctes atticae, 7.
Gellius Poplicola, who accused his son of stuprum with his stepmother; the son was acquitted however.