Gemara


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Related to Gemara: Mishnah, Talmud, Babylonian Gemara

Gemara:

see TalmudTalmud
[Aramaic from Heb.,=learning], in Judaism, vast compilation of the Oral Law with rabbinical elucidations, elaborations, and commentaries, in contradistinction to the Scriptures or Written Laws. The Talmud is the accepted authority for Orthodox Jews everywhere.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, in a tender anthropomorphism, the Gemara imagines God engrossed in prayer.
There are two Talmuds that consist of the Mishnah and commentary on the Mishnah, called the Gemara.
16) Prophets, Writings, Mishnah, Gemara, Responsa, legislation and custom all rise from the bottom point of the inverted pyramid as interpretations of Torah.
El Talmud consiste en la ley judaica que incluye la Mishna y la Gemara.
The Bible is referred to as the Written Law, as contrasted with the Oral Law, a set of rabbinic commentaries on the Bible including the Mishna and Gemara, which together constitute the Talmud.
The Talmud is the compilation of ancient Jewish oral law, and consists of the Mishna and the Gemara.
The Gemara provides a commentary on these codified laws.
The Mishnah, however, is never studied on its own but rather within the context of ensuing commentary, the Gemara (the Jerusalem and Babylonian Talmuds), redacted several centuries later.
I believe we might as well drop the distinction between Koran and hadith, unless we agree to understand the difference between them as precisely parallel to that between Mishnah and Gemara in Rabbinical Judaism.
The Talmud, which is the compilation of Jewish oral law, explains and expounds on the Hebrew Bible and consists of the Mishna and Gemara.
And despite the abrupt demise of temporary Nazirite vows after the events of AD 70(52) there still exists a significant Gemara on the subject in both Talmuds, perhaps because Nazir was a special topic within the larger and abiding subject of Nedarim (`vows'), which immediately precedes it in the Mishnaic sequence of tractates.