Gene Amdahl


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Amdahl, Gene

(1922–  ) computer engineer; born in Flandreau, S.D. Working for International Business Machines (IBM) at Poughkeepsie, N.Y., he helped design the IBM 704 in the 1950s and the S/360 series of computers in the early 1960s. In the 1970s, he ran Amdahl Corporation, then the largest manufacturer of IBM-compatible computers. In 1980, he formed Trilogy to build large computers.

Gene Amdahl

(person)
A former IBM engineer who founded Amdahl Corporation.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is considerable skepticism regarding the viability of massive parallelism; the skepticism centers around Amdahl's law, an argument put forth by Gene Amdahl in 1967 [1] that even when the fraction of serial work in a given problem is small, say, s, the maximum speedup obtainable from even an infinite number of parallel processors is only 1/s.
40% Gene Amdahl 39% Tim Berners-Lee 31% Jack Kilby 22% Grace Hopper 19% Vinton Cerf 19% Ted Codd 14% Linus Torvalds 10% Steve Jobs 8% Marc Andeesen 7% Gordon Moore 6% Other 4% James Gosling 2% Philip Zimmerman 2% Richard Stallman 2% Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman 2% Alan Kay 1% Base 444
Clark, author, innovator and space age expert -- Mark Gorenberg, Partner, Hummer Winblad Venture Partners -- Tom Kelley, General Manager, IDEO -- Lawrence Lessig, author and Stanford professor -- Bruce Perens, Open Source Advocate, Hewlett-Packard -- Jef Raskin, author and creator of the Macintosh -- Gene Amdahl, Grandfather of the Modern Computer The conference fee is $295 for registrations completed by July 17 and $395 for registration after that date.
Gene Amdahl and based in Sunnyvale, California, develops and markets enterprise servers/mainframes for the IBM S/370, S/390 commercial computing environments.
Gene Amdahl will deliver an opening speech at The Application Developers Conference here at CA World in New Orleans.
Gene Amdahl, "father" of the 360 computer, one of the world's most respected computer scientists, founder of Amdahl Corporation, and chairman of Commercial Data Servers said, "The Year 2000 conversion is a real IT challenge -- enough challenge to bring banks to a halt.