dosage compensation

(redirected from Gene dose)
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dosage compensation

[′dō·sij ‚käm·pən‚sā·shən]
(genetics)
A mechanism that equalizes the expression in males and females of genes located on the X chromosome, despite their presence in two doses in the homogametic sex and a single dose in the heterogametic sex.
A mechanism that equalizes the expression of X-linked and autosomal genes by doubling the expression level of X-linked genes in male Drosophila and in both male and female mammals with their single active X.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore this chip cannot fully support the gene dose concept for the prediction of CYP2D6 metabolic activity (12).
Allele-specific change of concentration and functional gene dose for the prediction of steady-state serum concentrations of amitriptyline and nortriptyline in CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 extensive and intermediate metabolizers.
Gene dose of apoliprotein E type 4 allele and the risk of Alzheimer's disease in late onset families.
By contrast, we are able to routinely achieve a manyfold greater transfer of genes into target tissues than can be achieved using commonly available methods, providing better probability of achieving an effective therapeutic gene dose.
This was accomplished by expressing the CYP2D6 genotype in terms of semi-quantitative CYP2D6 gene dose.
Functional gene dosages were calculated, based on measured ASCOC values for individual alleles, by defining the reference gene dose as having a value of 2 (Table 1).
For the wild type with two functional alleles, this gives a functional gene dose of 2, which is, in this case, set arbitrarily for two functional genes divided by 1, which is the relative concentration expected for the homozygous wild type.
To allow comparison with published data, we assigned a semiquantitative gene dose (SGD) of 1 for functional alleles, 0 for completely dysfunctional null alleles (e.
Gene dose of apolipoprotein E type 4 allele and the risk of Alzheimer's disease in late onset families.
Identifying associations in regions like this where X-chromosomal gene doses are not balanced between men and women can be particularly valuable in helping us to understand why some characteristics differ between sexes, he continues.