allele frequency

(redirected from Gene frequencies)
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allele frequency

[ə′lēl ¦frē·kwən·sē]
(genetics)
The fraction of all alleles at a given locus constituted by a particular allele in a population. Also known as gene frequency.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1: Genotype and gene frequencies of the PCR-SSCP in different regions sheep Region Genotype Genotype frequencies frequencies MM MN M N Shoshtar 0.
Second, owing to a variety of causes, the same breeding group might be characterized by different gene frequencies and different traits at different times.
The gene frequencies of Norse immigrants may have been too similar to indigenous patterns to show up after a millennium of contact.
The gene frequencies of these 3 alleles in a typical white population are as follows: allele 1, 0.
Based on the gene frequencies found on chromosomes 21 and 22, some researchers now believe that the total number of genes that it takes to make a human being might be as few as 40,000, rather than the 70,000 to 140,000 predicted earlier.
Wacziarg, associate professor of economics, draws on the work of the Cavalli-Sforza Lab at Stanford, where Luigi Cavalli-Sforza and his collaborators have spent their lives gathering data on gene frequencies across populations worldwide.
Variants of somatotropin in cattle: gene frequencies in major dairy breeds and associated milk production.
In addition, these new data indicate that there are marked racial and ethnic differences in the gene frequencies and prevalence of the PiS and PiZ alleles worldwide (de Serres 2002).
In their monograph, they reported that such a cline (trend) in gene frequencies was expected where farming had spread by demic diffusion.
The counting method was used for the estimation of the apo AI-CIII-AIV cluster gene frequencies.
Comparison of the results obtained in the present study with the allele spectrum and the gene frequencies profile reported in other cattle breeds showed that differences existed in the distribution of frequency of occurrence of the BoLA-DRB3.
People of the Basque region are proud of their unique past, reflected in identity, language, culture, landscape and gene frequencies (1994: 276, 280-87), which have probably evolved interactively from as far back as the Palaeolithic.