principle of covariance

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principle of covariance

[′prin·sə·pəl əv kō′ver·ē·əns]
(relativity)
In classical physics and in special relativity, the principle that the laws of physics take the same mathematical form in all inertial reference frames.
In general relativity, the principle that the laws of physics take the same mathematical form in all conceivable curvilinear coordinate systems.
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It took well over 8 years of one of mankind's greatest intellectual (philosophical, physical, mathematical) struggles towards synthesis in history for the greatly isolated, independent, original, and visionary young scientific creator--Albert Einstein--to complete the task since 1907 when he first attempted the logical extension of the Special Theory of Relativity (born in 1905) to include gravitation and more general reference frames under the umbrella of differential geometry and general covariance (first with the help of Einstein's friend, Marcel Grossmann, who helped select and qualify Riemannian geometry for Einstein's new physics program, and also of Tulio Levi-Civita and Hermann Weyl upon the later publication of the final form of General Relativity).
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