geocentric

(redirected from Geocentrism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

geocentric

1. having the earth at its centre
2. measured from or relating to the centre of the earth

geocentric

[¦jē·ō¦sen·trik]
(astronomy)
Relative to the earth as a center; that is measured from the center of the earth.

geocentric

Meaning "earth centered," it refers to orbits around the earth. In ancient times, it meant that the earth was the center of the universe. See geostationary and geosynchronous.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the Almagestum Novum analysis of the heliocentrism versus geocentrism debate, which Edward Grant has described as "the lengthiest, most penetrating, and authoritative analysis made by any author of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries," (35) Riccioli assembled 126 arguments put forward by both sides: 49 favored heliocentrism; 77 favored geocentrism.
He contends that those who accept young earth creationism but reject geocentrism are actually rejecting the model with the stronger biblical case.
Someone could tomorrow start a Church of Christian Geocentrism, insisting that all astronomy since Copernicus, Kepler, and Galileo is mistaken, and such views would receive the same political protection accorded all religious and secular beliefs (including, in the United States, the tax exemptions extended to all religious institutions).
One cannot claim a definitive conversion of Campanella to Copernicanism nor a definitive abandonment of geocentrism.
As forecasted almost three decades ago by Perlmutter (1969), MNCs have evolved from the strict unitary orientations of either ethnocentrism or polycentrism to one of geocentrism regarding the development and implementation of a worldwide strategy.
23) Copernicus's heliocentric model of the universe was, ultimately, no more perfect than Ptolemy's geocentrism, but it was right for its time and opened a door to an imaginative space in which Newton and Einstein could build their ever-farther-reaching observatories of reality.
Harries' argument draws not only on Cusanus' endorsement of the principle of the relativity of motion, an infinite uriverse (on the analogy of an infinite God), and the rejection of geocentrism but also, and more originally and problematically, on his concept o f "learned ignorance.
Perlmutter's (1969) call for geocentrism is the precursor to the now-called-for transnational organization (Bartlett and Ghoshal, 1989).