geodetic precession

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geodetic precession

[¦jē·ə¦ded·ik prē′sesh·ən]
(relativity)
The precession of a gyroscope in orbit about the earth due to the curvature of space of the Schwarzschild metric.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lunar ranging and the Cassini measurement already have tested the part of relativity governing the geodetic effect at comparable levels of precision.
The theory predicts the geodetic effect will change the gyroscopes' spin axis by slightly more than 6.
In most situations the geodetic effect is extremely small, but it is enough to explain every known property of gravity with perfect precision--so far.
The most accurate measurement of the geodetic effect to date, involving gravitational lensing of radio signals from the Cassini spacecraft, matches Einstein's prediction to about 1 part in 40,000 (when measured in terms of a quantity called gamma; see the January issue, page 18).
Known as the geodetic effect, the tilt would amount to 6.