geologic time scale

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geologic time scale

[¦jē·ə¦läj·ik ′tīm ‚skāl]
(geology)
The relative age of various geologic periods and the absolute time intervals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Evidence of abrupt change -- on a geological time scale -- wrought by human hands would seem to be overwhelming.
They even have a name for this new era: the Anthropocene, the age of humans, a bit of hubristic distortion of the geological time scale.
He also has had close contact with the paleoecology community so he has a view of ecology on a geological time scale.
Scientists in several geological societies suggest that the impact of the human species has been so profound on our planet--our atmosphere, lands, and water--that a new age in the Geological Time Scale of Earth should be defined.
The geological time scale shows how the Earth has changed considerably during many different periods of its history - even Shakespeare lived through a period known as The Little Ice Age.
On a geological time scale, both processes reflect persistent phenomena while LIP formation is transient.
Currently, the worldwide geological community is formally considering whether the Anthropocene should join the Jurassic, Cambrian and other more familiar units on the Geological Time Scale.
There has been a protracted debate over the position and status of Quaternary in the geological time scale and the intervals of time it represents.
Appendices include tables and taxonomies of extinct, recent and extant primates; a geological time scale, diagrams of anatomical landmarks, and an event timeline of human biology and evolution.
Gives insights in the construction, strengths, and limitations of the geological time scale that greatly enhances its function and its utility.
The geological time scale divides Earth's history into units called -- and its subdivisions, --.
It is the spontaneous transition from the prototype worm-shaped or soft-bodied form to complex characteristics within each phylum, and it happened in a blink of an eye on the geological time scale.