Shape

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Shape

Implies a three-dimensional definition that indicates outline and bulk of the outlined area.

shape

1. Any of a number of metal bars or beams of uniform section, as an I-beam.
2. To cut a profile or detail, as a beaded or rounded edge on a board.
3. To work a material to a required pattern, as on a shaper.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to the lines, the geometric shapes used in this activity give students an opportunity to further explore and define the various characteristics of rectangles, squares, ovals, and circles.
By creating the geometric shape design and building their design to scale, students are creating a full-scale prototype of their geometric design, thus providing a real-world application for the need to learn about the various shapes in mathematics.
When all rubbings are complete, ask students to select specific textures for specific shapes in their drawn geometric shape T design.
PART 1: IDENTIFYING GEOMETRIC SHAPES Geometric shapes have been used to communicate art forms since ancient times.
This network view includes a node represented by a geometric shape for each gene and protein, and links to indicate relationships.
Ziegler develops these concerns on the basis of a single building block, a six-sided shieldlike module used sometimes as a flat, colored, geometric shape parallel to the picture plane but more often deployed in perspectival recession.
I asked each child to choose their favorite large geometric shape from their five pieces and to draw a large eye on that piece.
Several challenges surface in nanometer design -- an exponential increase in total geometric shape count, a sharp rise in the number and complexity of design rules, and requirements for post-layout modifications such as planarization fill, OPC or scattering bars to ensure manufacturability.
Both sheets depict a sort of geometric shape that is multiplied and repeated ad infinitum, superimposed over and over again.
Perslow's design uses the pentagon -- a strong geometric shape -- as its central design metaphor.
An additional aspect of the project was borne out in a series of 220 small graphite drawings, each detailing the contours of another discrete geometric shape.