Custer

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Related to George Armstrong Custer: Sitting Bull, Little Big Horn

Custer

George Armstrong. 1839--76, US cavalry general: Civil War hero, killed fighting the Sioux Indians at Little Bighorn, Montana
References in periodicals archive ?
Elliot, Custerology: The Enduring Legacy of the Indian Wars and George Armstrong Custer 2 (2007) (referring to the "arena of historical interpretation and commemoration as 'Custerology'").
George Armstrong Custer, the 60-day expedition set out on 2 July 1874 from Fort Abraham Lincoln, just across the Missouri River from Bismarck, North Dakota.
General George Armstrong Custer was particularly fond of the .
George Armstrong Custer and the 260 members of his 7th Cavalry who died in the storied battle that occurred on June 25, 1876.
For over a century, General George Armstrong Custer has been remembered for his ``last stand'' during which he gave up his life in a desperate struggle to defend his troops against a savage Indian attack.
Colonel George Armstrong Custer was in charge of the Seventh Cavalry.
HISTORIANS believe one of America's best-loved heroes, General George Armstrong Custer, could have hailed from Orkney.
One hundred twenty years ago today, on a June afternoon also said to be hot, George Armstrong Custer and his men lay dying on this hillside overlooking the Little Bighorn River.
I got through a fascinating book on General George Armstrong Custer, Son of the Morning Star, by Evan S.
An editorial in Indian Country Today compared Costner's "gold rush" with the invasions of the Paha Sapa ("hills that are black") during the 1870s by General George Armstrong Custer, who violated treaties and triggered a rush in the hills for what Lakota holy man Black Elk called "the yellow metal that drives white men crazy.
Shortly after the deaths of Colonel George Armstrong Custer and Colonel Myles Keogh, one of his officers at the Battle of the Little Big Horn on June 25, 1876, General Nelson A.
Bridge" remain among the most insightful portraits of 20th century middle-American suburban life ever written, and his biography of General George Armstrong Custer, "Son of the Morning Star," re-imagines the story of the Old West as a complicated tragedy marked by narcissism and genocide.