George Washington Crile

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Crile, George Washington

(krīl), 1864–1943, American surgeon, b. Coshocton co., Ohio, M.D. Univ. of Wooster medical school (later merged with Western Reserve Univ.), 1887. He taught at the Univ. of Wooster (1889–1900) and at Western Reserve Univ. (1900–1924) and was a founder and director (from 1921) of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. He worked on hemorrhage and transfusion, surgery of the thyroid, and shock, developing the technique of anociassociation to prevent surgical shock. His works include Diseases Peculiar to Civilized Man (1934), Phenomena of Life (1936), and Intelligence, Power, and Personality (1941).

Crile, George Washington

(1864–1943) surgeon; born near Chili, Ohio. After taking his medical degree at the University of Wooster (Ohio) and studying in Europe, he taught at Wooster (1889–1900) and then was affiliated with the Western Reserve School of Medicine (Cleveland) (1900–24). He founded the Cleveland Clinic (1921). Interested in the phenomenon of "shock" subsequent to blood loss, he popularized the use of the blood pressure cuff. He demonstrated the importance of measuring peripheral and venous pressures during surgery and developed safer surgical techniques.
References in periodicals archive ?
d) This is a reference to George Crile III's 2003 book by the same name, which details U.
One of them, George Crile, I consider the top genius ever in medicine.
Dr George Crile took up the challenge to train nurses in the safe administration of anaesthetic to patients as did Dr Arthur Guedel who also actively taught hundreds of individuals on the safe administration of ether to surgical patients during WW1.
George Crile, the journalist friend of Wilson who wrote the book "Charlie's War" is the grandson of Dr.
Much of the early work on thyroid disease, as we shall see, took place in Swiss medical centres, and at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minnesota with the Mayo brothers, and the Cleveland Clinic, in Ohio, with George Crile.
Cushing and his colleague, George Crile, continued to monitor blood pressure during operations and began to change their practice as a result.
Over a period of fifteen years of research and reporting, George Crile traveled repeatedly to Afghanistan, Pakistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Kuwait, and Israel and throughout the United States to interview the many who played prominently in bringing about the Afghan mujahideen victory over the Soviet Union's Red Army in early 1989.
But with a little bit of stardust it doesn't have to be that way - and the late journalist George Crile pulled off just such a master stroke with Charlie Wilson's War.
According to "Charlie Wilson's War," based on a nonfiction best seller by the late "60 Minutes" producer George Crile, credit for this goes almost exclusively to a good-timing Texas congressman, one of his super-wealthy female constituents and a communist-hating bulldog of a CIA operative.
The film, based on the best-selling book by George Crile and adapted for the bigscreen by Aaron Sorkin, tells the real-life story of a boozy, playboy U.
In Charlie Wilson's War, George Crile provides an overdue and exciting narrative history of that support and attempts to explain how the largest CIA operation in history unwittingly led to the attacks of September 11, 2001.
Author George Crile is a CBS television producer, and has put his Washington insider's knowledge to good use.