Croghan, George

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Croghan, George,

1791–1849, American military officer, b. near Louisville, Ky.; nephew of George Rogers ClarkClark, George Rogers,
1752–1818, American Revolutionary general, conqueror of the Old Northwest, b. near Charlottesville, Va.; brother of William Clark. A surveyor, he was interested in Western lands, served (1774) in Lord Dunmore's War (see Dunmore, John Murray, 4th earl
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 and William ClarkClark, William,
1770–1838, American explorer, one of the leaders of the Lewis and Clark expedition, b. Caroline co., Va.; brother of George Rogers Clark. He was an army officer (1792–96), serving in a number of engagements with Native Americans.
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. He won public acclaim and a congressional award for his defense of Fort Stephenson against almost overwhelming enemy forces in the War of 1812. Croghan later served under Zachary Taylor in the Mexican War.

Bibliography

See Army Life on the Western Frontier, selections from Croghan's official reports ed. by F. P. Prucha (1958).


Croghan, George

(krō`gən), d. 1782, American Indian agent, b. Ireland. He migrated to North America in 1741 and became (1756) deputy superintendent of Indian affairs under Sir William JohnsonJohnson, Sir William,
1715–74, British colonial leader in America, b. Co. Meath, Ireland. He settled (1738) in the Mohawk valley, became a merchant, and gained great power among the Mohawk and other Iroquois. He acquired large landed properties, founded (1762) Johnstown, N.
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. Croghan was to a large extent responsible for Johnson's success and reputation among Native Americans. In the French and Indian War (see under French and Indian WarsFrench and Indian Wars,
1689–1763, the name given by American historians to the North American colonial wars between Great Britain and France in the late 17th and the 18th cent.
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 he caused many tribes to desert the French cause.

Bibliography

See biographies by A. T. Volwiler (1926, repr. 1971) and N. B. Wainwright (1959).

Croghan, George

(?1720–82) Indian agent; born near Dublin, Ireland. He came to Philadelphia in 1741, learned Indian languages and soon built a trade empire on the Pennsylvania frontier. When the start of the French and Indian War (1754) ruined his trade, he became the deputy superintendent of northern Indian affairs (1756–72). He brought about the treaty which ended Pontiac's revolt (1766). During the American Revolution he was unjustly suspected of Loyalist sympathies; he also lost the fortune he had accumulated through trading and land speculation.
References in periodicals archive ?
American Major George Croghan, with 160 men garrisoned inside Stephenson's walls, held his troop's fire until the British were at point blank range.
The two partners had prepared their ground by mailing to an Indian negotiator in America named George Croghan a sealed envelope enclosed within a decoy letter.
There are, of course, men admired in these volumes--men such as William Johnson, Robert Rogers, and George Croghan.
A tough Irish trader from Pennsylvania, George Croghan, was operating trading centers on the Upper Ohio by the close of 1744.
A delegation of Huron, Ottawa, and Chippewa went to Fort Pitt and smoked the pipe of peace with George Croghan, representing the British.
Along the shore of Lake Erie, the expedition made contact with the pro-English band of Ottawa that already had smoked the pipe of peace with George Croghan.
That allowed an assortment of secondary figures -- George Croghan, for one -- to shoulder their way into roles more prominent than I had intended them to play.
The American commander there was Major George Croghan, a twenty-one-year-old Kentuckian.
The troops aboard the vessels were under Colonel George Croghan, the hero of Fort Stephenson, with Major Andrew Hunter Holmes as second in command.
Traders like the deceptive George Croghan became land speculators with great ease.