Read, George

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Read, George,

1733–98, American jurist, signer of the Declaration of Independence, b. near Northeast, Cecil co., Md. He was admitted to the bar in 1753 and later (1763–74) was attorney general of the Lower Counties (Delaware) and a member of the Continental Congress (1774–77). Initially opposed to the resolution for independence, he later signed the Declaration of Independence. He was president of the Delaware constitutional convention in 1776 and president of Delaware (1777–78). Read was a member of the Constitutional Convention (1787) and helped to make Delaware the first state to ratify the Constitution (Dec. 7, 1789). A U.S. Senator (1789–93), he resigned to become (1793) chief justice of Delaware.

Bibliography

See W. T. Read, Life and Correspondence of George Read (1870).

References in periodicals archive ?
Canabrava President, George Read, stated today: "This reorganization of our Canadian project portfolio enables Canabrava to focus on the Superior Craton projects to the best benefit for our shareholders.
My friend George read it (If Only) and said it was very funny," she smiles contentedly, "although he is biased.
Canabrava President George Read states, "This macrodiamond recovery from the Turnstone kimberlite is consistent with results from the nearby King Eider kimberlite, emphasizing the favourable macrodiamond abundance of this kimberlite cluster.
Mount Hope will immediately commence a detailed ground geophysical survey of all targets under the direction of George Read of George Read Consulting.
BULLET THEII Steve Boy George read a specially written poem for Steve, remembering him as a "new romantic, old romantic, futurist fashionista, Welshman, weirdo, sister, saint and sinner".
George read an article in the Boston Post about Mr.
DESPITE his name, 77-year-old George Read wasn't much of a bookworm for most of his life - until he discovered JK Rowling.
The letter was two pages long and George read it over and over again," the source added.
George read out the team to face Arbroath and Findley was down as a sub yet again.
The event at the Kings Gap hotel was attended by League of Friends president Peter Morris, chairman George Read and Hoylake Cottage chief executive Lin Cooke.
After retiring, George read many books and began writing his biography until he required the full-time care of the Belair Manor of Newington, CT.
Scurrying around trying to get the new Criminal Conflict and Civil Regional Counsel's Office for the Third District fully up and running by the January 1, 2008, deadline, George read these discouraging words: