George Wythe


Also found in: Legal, Wikipedia.
George Wythe
BirthplaceChesterville, Elizabeth City County, Virginia
Died
Known for signer of the United States Declaration of Independence

Wythe, George

(wĭth), 1726–1806, American lawyer, signer of the Declaration of Independence, b. Elizabeth City co., Va. Admitted to the bar in 1746, Wythe was a member (1754–55, 1758–68) and clerk (1769–75) of the house of burgesses. An opponent of British colonial policy, he drafted a remonstrance against the Stamp Act (1765) and was a delegate to the Continental Congress (1775–76). Wythe, aided by Thomas Jefferson and Edmund Pendleton, revised (1776) the laws of Virginia, and was influential in getting Virginia to ratify the Constitution. Perhaps his greatest contribution was as professor of law (1779–90) at the College of William and Mary; his teachings influenced many, including John Marshall, Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, and Henry Clay. Wythe was one of the greatest early U.S. lawyers. He served as judge (1778–88) in the Virginia chancery court and as sole chancellor (1788–1801).

Wythe, George

(1726–1806) judge, law educator; born in Hampton, Va. He served as the colony of Virginia's attorney general and in the House of Burgesses, but he opposed Britain's Stamp Act (1764) and was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. He was sole justice of Virginia's High Court (1789–1801). He defended judicial review, and at the College of William and Mary, he was the first professor of law in the United States (1779–90), teaching John Marshall, James Monroe, Henry Clay, and others who would become influential lawyers and government officials. He died from poisoning by a grandnephew seeking to secure a legacy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bill he drew after all this labor is notable for its studied simplicity, and the draft he submitted in advance to George Wythe represents, probably, the highest point he had yet attained in craftsmanship.
Just prior to his death, George Wythe (1726-1806), confidant of Thomas Jefferson and prominent American legal scholar, accused his grandnephew George Wythe Sweeney of poisoning him with arsenic in order to prevent the dilution of his inheritance caused by the provisions Wythe had made in his will for emancipating and providing for his two slaves, Lydia Broadnax, who survived the poisoning but was not allowed to testify at the trial because she was black, and her son, Michael Brown, who did not survive the poisoning.
Brown, American Aristides, a Biography of George Wythe 200-01 (Associated U.
Years later, Jefferson offered the following appraisal of his exceptional mentor:</p> <pre> No man ever left behind him a character more venerated than George Wythe.
George Wythe, the renowned Virginian who would come to be known as the "Teacher of Liberty," was himself taught to appreciate the writings of the ancients at home by his mother.
The elegant George Wythe Ballroom features high coffered ceilings, historic terrazzo tile floors, large windows and French doors.
Chadwick is the author of 28 books on George Washington, the Civil War, and sports, including, most recently, Lincoln for President and I Am Murdered: George Wythe, Thomas Jefferson, and the Killing That Shocked a New Nation.
The plantation was the home of George Wythe, a signer of the Declaration of Independence and prominent Virginia attorney, legislator and judge.
While their names and lineage link them to legendary Virginians John Randolph and George Wythe, their behavior toward women and their self-serving egotism link them to baby boomers of the seventies in ways that recall Hunter Thompson's condemnation of boomers as "a generation of swine.
George Tucker House, George Wythe House and Robert Carter