George of Trebizond


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George of Trebizond

(trĕb`ĭzŏnd), c.1396–1486, Greek scholar, b. Crete. Settling in Venice, he taught Greek, philosophy, and rhetoric there and in Vicenza before going to Rome in 1442. He became known as a translator of Aristotle and enjoyed the favor of popes Eugene IV, Nicholas V, and Paul II. He made translations of Plato and translated some Greek church writings into Latin.
References in periodicals archive ?
George of Trebizond, who also translated many of the Greek fathers into Latin, was "the chief scholar responsible for their wider diffusion in the West.
George of Trebizond fashioned the first new kind of rhetoric of the Renaissance.
The remaining articles focus on aspects of Petrarch, Poliziano, Manuzio, Gaza, George of Trebizond, and Marcello Adriani.
Here Hankins provides chapters on George of Trebizond, Pletho, Cardinal Bessarion, and a fascinating account of the dispute between Trebizond and Bessarion.
John Monfasani gives a detailed and careful analysis of his position in the great Plato-Aristotle controversy, a philosophical genre with roots in Middle Platonism that flourished anew in the Renaissance following the heated exchanges among Pletho, George of Trebizond, and Bessarion.
In the thirteenth century it influenced Aquinas, who had parts of Proclus' long commentary, along with the apposite lemmata, translated into Latin for him by the Dominican William of Moerbeke; and in the fifteenth, it molded the Platonism both of Cusanus, for whom it was quickly and sloppily translated by George of Trebizond (a rabid Aristotelian), and of Bessarion.
14) More complex and articulated than the versions of Fortunatianus or Martianus Capella is the Renaissance reworking of ductus theory by the Cretan humanist George of Trebizond (1395/96-1472/73), who appears to have been responsible for reintroducing this doctrine in the West.
Quintilian's Institutio Oratoria had been re-discovered by Poggio in 1416 and edited by Cardinal Campano in 1470, while Aristotle's Rhetoric had appeared in a Latin translation by George of Trebizond in 1478 and in a Greek edition, together with the Poetics, by Aldus Manutius in 1508.
In 1451, the great opponent of Plato, George of Trebizond, had argued that much of Plato's teaching was cloaked in obscurity, transmitted "per integumenta quaedam et enigmata.
Thus reference is made to res platonicae without recourse to the work of Hankins, to Pletho without Woodhouse or Masai, to George of Trebizond without Monfasani, to Ficino without Allen, to the beginnings of the Florentine Platonic revival without Field, and to ontological hierarchies without Mahoney, to name only a few instances.
Grouped under three headings - Rhetoric, Lorenzo Valla, and Humanism and Religion - the essays span the years from 1983 to 1992, a decade during which Monfasani also published the anthology of texts relating to George of Trebizond (Collectanea Trapezuntiana, 1984) and a biography of Fernando of Cordova (1992).