Georges Banks

Georges Banks

[¦jȯr·jəz ′baŋks]
(geology)
An elevation beneath the sea east of Cape Cod, Massachusetts.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Fishing rates for the Georges Banks cod, for example, declined by 50 percent since 2001.
The population of cod found near Georges Bank, off southern New England, decreased by 25 percent since 2001, the report shows.
Catches of six important commercial species, including Georges Bank haddock and Atlantic halibut, were up.
Pierre Banks near Burin; another masses along Nova Scotia's Atlantic coast, and still more on Georges Banks off New England.
They plied the Georges Banks of New England, the hake stocks of South Africa, Alaskan and Baring Sea Pollock, Antarctic krill and, most of all, the northern cod off Newfoundland and Labrador.
All through the 1960s up to the mid-1970s, distant-water fleets from the Soviet Union, Japan and other nations feasted upon the world's richest fishing grounds at Georges Banks, some 75 miles east of Cape Cod along the U.
A Georges Bank haddock fishery that yielded as much as 50,000 metric tons annually during the 1960s saw catches plummet to 880 metric tons by 1993.
The New England Council refused to put a lid on the groundfishery at Georges Banks, even after the Commerce Department declared several species at or near commercial extinction.
Canada's Grand Banks and New England's Georges Banks - once among the most plentiful fishing grounds anywhere - have undergone complete collapse.