Georgia Harmony Jubilee

Georgia Harmony Jubilee

Late April
Established in 2004, the week-long Georgia Harmony Jubilee celebrates the 1896 founding of Fitzgerald, Ga., by a group of some 2,000 Northern Civil War veterans and local Southerners. The idea came from Indianapolis newspaper publisher P.H. Fitzgerald, who was impressed when the state of Georgia donated huge quantities of food to help out drought-stricken towns in the North and Midwest. He saw that the wounds of the Civil War had finally healed. Fitzgerald proposed a town where elderly Northern veterans could retire to live with their former enemies. He organized the American Tribune Soldiers' Colony Company, which purchased 60,000 acres of virgin forest in southern Georgia for the project. The city's core is formed by seven streets named after Confederate Civil War generals, seven streets named after Union Civil War generals, and four named after Civil War ships. Sidewalks in the town are painted blue and gray in remembrance of the colors worn by the two armies.
The spirit of harmony—the ability of two former enemies to come together to form a new community 30 years after the end of the American Civil War—is the focus of the annual celebration. Highlights include a staging of Our Friends, the Enemy, a play about the town's founding, musical concerts, historical seminars, a tour of historic homes, arts and crafts, and a parade featuring flag bearers from all 50 states.
CONTACTS:
Fitzgerald Area Convention and Visitors Bureau
115 S. Main St.
Fitzgerald, GA 31750
800-386-4642 or 229-426-5033; fax: 229-426-5037
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