Kartuli

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Kartuli

 

(old name, lekurl), a Georgian paired folk dance. It is also known as the lezginka. The dance developed in Kartaliniia and Kakhetiia. The music is in 6/8 time. The dance is accompanied by an instrumental ensemble, made up of a dudka, a zurna, and a doli. The kartuli is danced in Paliashvili’s operas Daisi and Abesalom and Eteri.

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The Georgian language film will be screened again on September 28.
Turkey duzjes University, the University of Georgian language and literature department at the initiative of the Shota Rustaveli 850 anniversary of the International Conference was held, with the participation of Turkey and of the various universities in scientific circles, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and representatives of the Ministries of Education.
It circulated in medieval Islamic Arab texts, was translated into the Georgian language and eventually into Greek, then Latin and a wide variety of medieval vernacular languages, including its appearance in The Golden Legend.
Triangulation of sources, including English, Russian and Georgian language documents and publications, contributes to eliminate the problem of biased data.
A distinctive feature of this project, which lasted for more than one year, was the absence of Georgian language package for MS SharePoint.
Filled with admiration for the work, she threw herself into study of Georgian language and in 1912 Rustaveli was brought to English readers in a prose translation.
The first is that the Georgian language is of special interest to all foreign academics and linguists.
For those unable to go directly to Georgian language media, a considerable amount of information is provided to recompose the local landscape, something not particularly familiar to the average Western reader.
1999), Georgian Language and Culture: A continuing course, Bloomington, Indiana: Slavica.
I'd come to realise during the past few days that my captors believed I could understand something of the Georgian language.
Thus, although the witness to the martyrdom of these children is preserved in the Georgian language, the traditional site of these events, technically, was part of the ancient Caucasus region more broadly, yet not of "K'art'li" or "Iberia" specifically.
According to the Explanatory Dictionary of the Georgian Language, the denotational meaning of the word deda is 'a woman to her child(ren), a female parent' Chikobava, 1953: 1113).

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