Jerash

(redirected from Gerasene)

Jerash

(jĕr`ăsh), ancient city: see GerasaGerasa
, Gerash,
or Jerash
, ancient city of the Decapolis, 22 mi (35 km) N of Amman, in present-day Jordan. According to Josephus it was captured (83 B.C.) by Alexander Jannaeus, king of the Hasmonean dynasty, and rebuilt (A.D. 65) by the Romans.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Not surprisingly, "shortly afterward, the entire population of the Gerasene territory asked Jesus to leave their neighborhood" (Luke 8:37a).
He also held up people who were thought to be ritually unclean or even sinful because of a physical malady or their ethnicity (the Gerasene demoniac, the woman with a hemorrhage in Mark 5; the Syrophoenician woman in Mark 7; the boy with a demon in Mark 9; blind Bartimaeus in Mark 10).
For example, with respect to number, the unclean spirits in the stories of the synagogue and of the Gerasene demoniacs, are described by both singular and plural pronouns (Mark 1:21-27; Luke 4:31-37; Matt.
I hey had chosen to maintain separation and hostility toward the Gentiles rather than to do good for their enemies as Jesus did in his healing and feeding of Gentiles (for example, the exorcism of the Gerasene demoniac, the healing of the Syro-Phoenician woman's daughter, and the feeding of the 4000 from the Decapolis) as well as Jews.
Jesus' healings include his exorcisms, restoring to home and family those such as the Gerasene demoniac cut off by illness or evil spirits.
Jesus' proclamation of God's reign was shared with all equally, but a disproportionate number of the stories of specific encounters with individuals are devoted to those he had to cross a boundary to reach: the Gerasene demoniac, the Roman centurion's servant, the anointing sinful woman, the Samaritan woman, the woman caught in adultery, Zaccheus the tax collector, numerous lepers, and others.
The south aisle has a window dedicated to the healing arts, Elisha healing the Syrian commander Naaman of leprosy, A Knight Hospitaler healing, and Christ healing the Gerasene demoniac.
The healing of the Gerasene demoniac, for example, is described as a "thinly veiled 'exorcism' of Roman military occupation" (94).
Rather, I defined "literary criticism" as "the strategy of analyzing a text's literary features and of relating parts to the whole," for example, analyzing how the story of the Gerasene demoniac in Mark 5 fits into the whole of Mark's Gospel.
Jesus reveals the hidden truth of desire despite the resistance of the Gerasene townspeople.
Just prior to this incident is healing in a pagan and foreign territory (the Gerasene demoniac); it is followed by healing in a synagogue and home (the healing of Jairus' daughter).
He did not call to this form of life some of his most generous followers like the cured Gerasene demoniac (Luke 8:26-39), whom he sent back to his own people who would not allow Jesus himself to remain in their town.