germline

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germline

[′jərm ‚līn]
(biology)
A lineage of cells from which gametes are derived. Also known as germ track.
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, it is important to realize that a treatment similar to germ-line modification has been completed on humans.
For the past few decades, scientists have focused on deciphering the molecular mechanisms of the immortality of germ-line cells in order to find a means of using those insights to restore health to aging somatic (life-sustaining functional) cells.
Considering preimplantation embryos as human beings would halt any scientific studies and development of such biologic possibilities as germ-line gene and embryonic stem cell therapies and therapeutic cloning.
When inherited changes--we now know that these must be changes in germ-line DNA--leave some members of a species able to produce fertile offspring amongst themselves, but unable to produce fertile offspring with other members of the same species, then the germ-line DNAs of the smaller and larger subpopulations will begin to diverge from each other by random mutation.
What about preembryonics, stem-cell research, gene therapy, and germ-line genetic engineering?
I think that when you start messing with germ-line therapy or germ-line reproduction, you are talking about making irreversible changes in human genetics, and we have no idea what could happen.
Contrary to Stock, by the way, gays can't reproduce, so I'm not quite sure how they'd do germ-line intervention to produce gay children.
Germ-line gene therapy involves the introduction of a cloned gene by viral vector into germ-line cells so that the resulting gene correction is passed to future generations.
Germ-line transmission of a mutated p53 gene in a cancer-prone family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome.
It has contributed to our acceptance of organ transplantation and gene therapy and to our present investigation of the notions of machine intelligence and (in some quarters) germ-line genetic manipulation.
Council for Responsible Genetics, "Position Paper on Human Germ-Line Manipulation," 1992
Does germ-line genetic manipulation, which passes alterations to the next generation, compromise basic human dignity?