germline

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germline

[′jərm ‚līn]
(biology)
A lineage of cells from which gametes are derived. Also known as germ track.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Germ-line transmission of a planned alteration made in a hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells.
Culp P, Nusslein-Volhard C, Hopkins N (1991) High frequency germ-line transmission of plasmid DNA sequences injected into fertilized Zebrafish eggs.
Germ-line gene therapy will involve performing modifications on embryos in an attempt to forestall incurable diseases which arise from abnormal mitochondria.
Ethical questions raised include whether germ-line modification via mitochondrial replacement therapy is incompatible with human dignity and whether human cloning technology ought to be used to subvert disease.
During the last decade, some researchers have claimed that primordial follicles in adult mouse ovaries turn over and that females use adult germ-line stem cells to constantly resupply the follicle pool and sustain ovulation.
The germ-line is that lineage of cells that connects the generations and is the biological basis of the immortality of the species.
Reproductive potential of an organism can be prolonged indefinitely by using germ-line stem cells (14).
Nor will it be well guided by prohibitions of "enhancement," of "making children," or of germ-line genetic interventions.
The results indicated that germ-line epigenetics can be reprogrammed to influence future generations.
But changes wrought by so-called germ-line therapy alter the blueprint itself, the human genome, and would thus be passed on to offspring.
This publication is believed to be the first in which germ-line transmission from rat ES cells has been definitively demonstrated.
Stem Cell Sciences plc (Cambridge, England), a company focused on the commercialisation of stem cells and stem cell technologies, is pleased to announce that two independent laboratories in the UK and USA have achieved germ-line transmission from embryonic stem (ES) cells in rats using technologies exclusively licensed to the company by Edinburgh University.