German Democratic Republic-Czechoslovak Socialist Republic Treaty of

German Democratic Republic-Czechoslovak Socialist Republic Treaty of 1967 on Friendship, Cooperation, and Mutual Aid

 

signed on Mar. 17, 1967, in Prague. In accordance with the principles of socialist internationalism and on a basis of equal rights, respect for each other’s sovereignty, and noninterference in each other’s internal affairs, the German Democratic Republic (GDR) and the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic will deepen their friendship and develop cooperation in all areas, including economic and scientific-technical ties, coordination of national economic plans, cooperation in the sphere of scientific research and production, and relations in culture, scholarly work, and other areas.

In conformity with the United Nations Charter, both parties to the treaty will help ensure peace and security and will consistently implement the policy of peaceful coexistence. The parties stated that the Munich Pact of Sept. 29, 1938, as well as all its consequences, was invalid from the very beginning. The parties agreed to consider West Berlin a special political unit. They noted that the attainment of a peaceful regulation of the German question based on the recognition of the existence of two sovereign German states and the normalization of their mutual relations would meet the needs of European security. The GDR and the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic assumed the obligation to defend effectively the inviolability of the borders of both countries, in keeping with the Warsaw Pact of 1955, and to take all necessary measures to prevent aggression by the forces of West German militarism and revanchism. In the event of an armed attack on either party by a given country or group of countries, the other party will render immediate military and other forms of aid. The treaty was concluded for 20 years.

PUBLICATIONS

Neues Deutschland, Mar. 18, 1967.
Rudé právo, Mar. 18, 1967.

V. A. BABENKO

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