Deutschmark

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Deutschmark

, Deutsche Mark
the former standard monetary unit of Germany, divided into 100 pfennigs; replaced by the euro in 2002: until 1990 the standard monetary unit of West Germany
References in periodicals archive ?
By late August, the German mark was strengthening not only against the dollar but also against other European currencies in response to strains that were to become far more intense later in the period.
The dollar declined more against the German mark during this period than against other currencies.
From a strictly fiscal standpoint, the currency is being viewed no differently than the German mark or the French franc.
There were indeed plenty of reasons to change one's mind about the future, including the secretary of the treasury's hint that the dollar would be allowed to fall free against the German mark in a kind of devaluation war and monthly data indicating that the economy was weaker than expected.
The strong rebound of the dollar (which was also at a two-year high against the German Mark in early December) has benefitted vacationers - but, it may also end up hurting US exports, which have become more expensive overseas.
This 40 million German mark investment is part of a five-year investment program of approximately 100 million DM in the silane chemicals area.
Treasury securities and more German mark securities.
Generally, the mark-to-market rule applies to hedging instruments dealing with the following currencies: Japanese yen, British pound, Australian dollar, French franc, Swiss franc, German mark, Canadian dollar and European Currency Unit.
These currencies include the German mark, Dutch guilder, Italian lira and the French franc.
With the dollar languishing against key currencies such as the Euro, the German mark and the British pound, and US interest rates close to historical lows, more foreign investors will find US investment appealing.
This confronted German chemicals and other exports with steep tariffs despite falling prices as the German mark depreciated.