Gersonides


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Gersonides

(gərsŏn`ĭdēz) or

Levi ben Gershon

(lē`vī bĕn gûr`shən), 1288–1344, Jewish philosopher, astronomer, and mathematician, called also Ralbag, from the initials of his Hebrew name, b. Languedoc. He wrote scientific works and commentaries on Averroës and the Torah. His Milchamoth Adonai [the wars of the Lord] is an elaborate treatise modeled after the Moreh Nevukhim of Maimonides. It is mainly a systematic criticism of the syncretism of Maimonides. His scientific views remained influential into the 19th cent.
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58) In a similar way, and probably with more sincerity, Gersonides determines that Maimonides erred in his assumption that the opinions of the speakers in the Book of Job corresponded to the views found in his own environment, although he insists that the breakdown of opinions in the Book of Job is logically determined.
Indeed, both Sforno and Gersonides (Ralbag) on I Samuel 1:23 indicate that Elkanah made the consecration official by using the phrase May the Lord fulfill His word.
Without any doubt"; Gersonides on method and knowledge.
Among the examples are opinions about experience and hypotheses within Locke's realm, contingent laws of nature in Emile Boutroux, hypothesis and convention in Poincare's defense of Galilei spacetime, Duhem verses and Maimonides versus Gersonides on instrumentalism and realism as categories in the history of astronomy, and the hypothetical metaphysics of nature.
The rationalist tradition was continued by Gersonides (1288-1344), who made significant contributions in areas as varied as astronomy, logic, and the problem of free will and divine providence.
9) See Robert Eisen, Gersonides on Providence, Covenant, and the Chosen People: A Study in Medieval Jewish Philosophy and Biblical Commentary (Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1995), p.
Freudenthal's collection of sixteen articles, written over a period of twenty years, is thematically divided into three sections: Science in the Medieval Hebrew Tradition: Socio-Cultural Considerations (two articles); Maimonides, Gersonides and Some Others (eight articles); and Reverberations of Greek Theory of Matter in Arabic and Hebrew (eight articles).
The phrase all who urinate against the wall (mashtin be-kir) is understood by Gersonides to refer specifically to males (see Gersonides there and to I Sam.
Levi ben Gershon (1288-1344), known by his Latin name Gersonides, was a major Jewish philosopher, scientist, and biblical commentator who lived in Provence, France.
Following Gersonides, and directly against Maimonides, who, Garrett explains, was always a strong presence in Spinoza's mind, Spinoza held that method ought to be didactic and therefore lucid and readily accessible, as well as therapeutic by "[linking] our desires to a proper understanding of God" (p.
The next section is "The Jewish Philosophical Tradition in the Islamic Cultural world," which treats Saadiah Gaon, Ibn Gabriol, Judah Halevi, Maimonides, Gersonides, as well as articles on Judaism and Sufism and Jewish Averroism.