Geryon


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Geryon

(jĕr`ēən, jərĭ`ən), in Greek mythology, three-bodied monster who, with his dog Orthrus, watched over a great herd of cattle. He and Orthrus were killed by Hercules when, as his 10th labor, he stole the cattle.

Geryon

celebrated monster with three united bodies or three heads. [Rom. Lit.: Aeneid]
References in periodicals archive ?
red crab, Geryon quinquedens; and monkfish, Lophius americanus, decreasing landings) reflect a fishery characterized by large vessels and large, but decreasing, landings of sea scallops, large groundfish, skates, red crab, and monkfish.
The members (Aphrodite) and blood (Furies and Giants) of Ouranos also are represented as creative powers; so too the blood of Medusa which brings forth Geryon a monster Dante wrote into his epic as an embodiment of violence (Inferno, cantos 16-17; on Nessus 12-17).
Yellow gives way to red; Van Gogh to the writer-photographer Geryon.
The streak Geryon, noticeable in 2001, was much fainter.
The gun, a mortar presented to the Prince Regent after the siege of Cadiz in 1812, was placed on an elaborate carriage constructed in the form of the dragon-like monster Geryon, defeated by Hercules.
For instance, when Riffaterre writes "narrative verisimilitude tends to flaunt rather than mask its fictitious nature," he perfectly describes why Dante uses the representation of the monster Geryon as an outrageously inauthentic authenticating device on which to stake the truth of his poem:
This case for the continuity of the Spanish monarchy from the Visigoths to the present, hence its antiquity, crystallized by the end of the fifteenth century into an unyielding position that located Spanish origins in classical antiquity and Biblical myth: Hercules, Geryon, Tartessos, the Fortunate Isles, Noah and Tubal.
Fleming's remarkable analysis of the Geryon character in Dante's Inferno, with myriad allusions to classical, scriptural, and patristic sources; and Marsha L.
After Hercules had obtained the Cattle of Geryon, he thought his task was complete, but the Oracle kept piling on more.
Carson's (1999a) Autobiography of Red can be seen as an extended response to the fragment of Stesichorus's lost epic which describes a fight between Geryon and the mighty Heracles.