William of Malmesbury

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William of Malmesbury

(mämz`bərē), c.1096–1143, English writer, monk of Malmesbury. His most important work is the Gesta regum Anglorum, a history of the kings of England from 449 to 1127, with its continuation, Historia novella (ed. by William Stubbs, 1887–89). Book V is contemporary history, especially valuable for the reigns of Henry I and Stephen. The work appeared in English as The Chronicle of the Kings of England (see ed. by J. A. Giles, 1847, repr. 1968). He also wrote Gesta pontificum Anglorum, a source for early ecclesiastical history and for several saints' lives.
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102) For the relatively voluminous manuscript survival of this text, see 'Introduction', in Gesta Regum Anglorum, eds Mynors, Thomson, and Winterbottom, i, xiii-xxvi.
As Griscom's manuscript ends close to the end of Book III of William of Malmesbury's Gesta, Griscom puts forth a fairly safe claim that at the time of rebinding, the manuscript terminated at the end of Book III, without completing the text of Gesta Regum Anglorum to the end of Book V.
247 included at least parts of Book IV of Malmesbury's Gesta Regum Anglorum.
Only seven of them are bound together with William of Malmesbury's Gesta Regum Anglorum.
In Book III of his Gesta Regum Anglorum William of Malmesbury includes a fairly extensive section dealing with the First Crusade and its aftermath.
A new edition, translation, and commentary is currently in progress: William of Malmesbury, Gesta Regum Anglorum, ed.
Haruko Momma's essay considers the representation of other languages in Latin in William of Malmesbury's Gesta regum Anglorum and questions the implications of this linguistic flattening for medieval readers.