Gethsemane

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Gethsemane

(gĕthsĕm`ənē), olive grove or garden, E of Jerusalem, near the foot of the Mount of Olives. In the Gospels, it is the scene of the agony and betrayal of Jesus. A number of sites in the area of the Garden are tended by representatives of the Christian tradition. The Franciscan Basilica of the Agony is built over the ruins of a 4th-century church.

Gethsemane

scene of Christ’s agony over impending death. [N.T.: Matthew 26:36–45; Mark 14:32–41]

Gethsemane

New Testament the garden in Jerusalem where Christ was betrayed on the night before his Crucifixion (Matthew 26:36--56)
References in periodicals archive ?
Soon after the death of Thomas Merton, Flavian Burns OCSO, the Abbot at Gethsemani, called Merton a spiritual master.
Antonin and Murat, and his formational experiences in Rome and New York City, Weis demonstrates the significant effects of each on his understanding of landscape during the period of his novitiate at the Abbey of Gethsemani in 1941.
1964, when Milosz visited Merton at the Abbey of Gethsemani, and again
In the late 1950s, for example, he had asked to be allowed to transfer from his monastery to a monastery in Mexico where he hoped to be permitted greater solitude than he could experience at the Abbey of Gethsemani in Kentucky.
I am the West vocational director for the Lay Cistercians of Gethsemani Abbey in Kentucky.
Wiseman's The Gethsemani Encounter: A Dialogue on the Spiritual Life by Buddhist and Christian Monastics (Continuum, 1999), respectively--are never referred to either.
In 1965 Thomas Merton, the American Trappist monk, writer and poet, translated twelve poems from The Keeper of Sheep (Kentucky: Abbey of Our Lady of Gethsemani, 1965), working from the Spanish versions by Octavio Paz and from the original Portuguese published in Brazil by Maria Aliete Galhoz (Pessoa, Obra Poetica, ed.
Gethsemani was receiving an extraordinary influx of novices, many of them drawn by reading The Seven Storey Mountain (Merton, 1948).
Brahms' dark and majestic Tragic Overture opens the programme and is followed by Gethsemani Fragment by Michael Berkeley, composer- in-association with BBC Now and the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama.
Sent off the 11-10 favourite over Breeders' Cup Juvenile winner Action This Day, who was making his seasonal debut, Master David trailed pacesetter Gethsemani into the straight before getting on top in the final furlong.
Gethsemani finished three lengths behind the top pair in third as the timer blinked 1:09 2/5 for the six furlong Grade II dash.