Geysir


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Geysir

(gā`sĭr), hot spring, SW Iceland, c.75 mi (120 km) W of Reykjavík. Although in medieval times it erupted three times daily, weeks now elapse between eruptions. The height and temperature of the jet are variable, reaching up to 200 ft (60 m) and 180°F; (82°C;). There are many other hot springs in the vicinity, but few have eruptions. Hot water is piped into Reykjavík and used for heating. The generic term geyser in English is derived from Geysir.
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At the Geysir geothermal area you can watch the exploding geysers and the bubbling crystal clear hot springs.
While I learned a lot about Iceland through several web sites, I think I learned more by just talking to locals and actually going through the Icelandic experience: driving its scenic roads in snowy and windy conditions, savoring its langoustine lobster and Viking beer, and appreciating the grandeur of its Geysir, Gulfoss and Glacier lagoon.
Other photographic highlights in southern Iceland include Dyrholaey, a coastal rock arch reminiscent of Dorset's Durdle Door, and Geysir, the original spouting hot spring after which all the worlds geysers are named.
For our second day in Iceland, Haf recommended the "Golden Triangle," a 120-mile drive to the country's three top tourist attractions: Thingvellir, Geysir and Gullfoss.
They will make new friends from across the world and visit Geysir and the stunning waterfalls of Gullfoss.
To explore the country at its best, choose a tour package that will allow you to enjoy Iceland's best attractions which include the northern lights, Blue Lagoon (a geo-thermal spa in a lava field), erupting hot springs in Geysir, Gullfoss Waterfall and much more.
We skipped classic tourist attractions like the Blue Lagoon and the Great Geysir, and drove out into the snowy wilderness before the sun had even risen above the mountains.
Our tour includes the stunning Gullfoss waterfall, the temperamental geysers in the appropriately named Geysir geothermal area, and the historic Thingvellir National Park, where American and Eurasian tectonic plates are slowly shifting apart.
We next encountered the geothermal waters at the Geysir Hot Springs, where we dodged sulphur-scented boiling waters gushing 70 metres into the sky as regular as clockwork.
It's not, though, something I'd attempt the following day at Haukadalur valley, where the powerful Geysir shoots boiling water up to 70m into the air.