Qasida

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Qasida

 

a poetic genre in the literature of the peoples of the Middle East and Central and South Asia.

The qasida is a panegyric ode in praise of an influential person. Its formal characteristics are considerable size (from 20 to 200 bayts), a single end rhyme (aa, ba, ca, da…), and three-part composition. According to medieval canon, the qasida opens with the nasib, or lyrical prelude, in which the author mourns his separation from his beloved. It is followed by a description of the poet’s journey to the figure being praised. The main, and last, part is the poet’s tribute. Philosophical qasidas developed in the 11th and 12th centuries. The fact that the mention of an influential person is indispensible and often coupled with dates and historical events makes qasidas an important historical source. The most outstanding masters of the genre were the Arab poets Imru al-Qays (sixth century) and Abu Tammam (ninth century), the Persian-Tajik poets Unsuri and Anvari (11th century), and the Azerbaijani poet Khagani (12th century).

REFERENCES

Krachikovskii, I. Iu. “Arabskaia poeziia.” Izbr. soch., vol. 2. Moscow, 1956.
Bertel’s, E. E. Istoriia persidsko-tadzhikskoi literatury. Moscow, 1960.

N. B. KONDYREVA