Ghassulian Culture

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Ghassulian Culture

 

an archaeological culture of the Aeneolithic period (end of the fifth millennium B.C. to the fourth millennium B.C.). It is named after the village Teleilat el-Ghassul, which is situated 5.5 km east of the Jordan River. The Ghassulian culture was widespread over the territory of modern Jordan and Israel. It is characterized by flint tools and adobe buildings constructed on stone foundations, sometimes with interior wall paintings. The stone pottery and earthenware were made on a primitive wheel in the shape of goblets and amphorae. The dead were usually buried individually in stone cists.

REFERENCES

Childe. V. G. Drevneishii Vostok v svete novykh raskopok. Moscow. 1956. (Translated from English.)
Mallon. A. Teleilat Ghassul, vols. 1–2. Rome. 1934–40.
References in periodicals archive ?
303-5): do the Canaanite blades and cores, a hallmark of the EB in the southern Levant, found at the site belong to the Ghassulian Chalcolithic flint assemblages or they are intrusive at Fazael 2 and the contiguous site excavated by Porat (no.
stage of the Ghassulian, and they indeed have some EB characteristics (some 400 years before the EB IA).
It is clear that the Ghassulian or Late Chalcolithic constitutes a primary period in late prehistory, augmenting considerably the number of sites compared to the Neolithic and Early Chalcolithic (forty-five new sites).
Their topics include the emergence of the Ghassulian textile industry in the southern Levant Chalcolithic Period about 4500-3900 BC, the crescent shaped loom weight as evidence for technology and palace economy in Middle Bronze Age Anatolia, considering the finishing of textiles based on neo-Sumerian inscription from Girsu, tapestries in the Bronze and Early Iron Ages of the Ancient Near East, and the whorls from Ugarit at the Musee d'Archeologie Nationale and at the Louvre.