Ghassulian Culture

Ghassulian Culture

 

an archaeological culture of the Aeneolithic period (end of the fifth millennium B.C. to the fourth millennium B.C.). It is named after the village Teleilat el-Ghassul, which is situated 5.5 km east of the Jordan River. The Ghassulian culture was widespread over the territory of modern Jordan and Israel. It is characterized by flint tools and adobe buildings constructed on stone foundations, sometimes with interior wall paintings. The stone pottery and earthenware were made on a primitive wheel in the shape of goblets and amphorae. The dead were usually buried individually in stone cists.

REFERENCES

Childe. V. G. Drevneishii Vostok v svete novykh raskopok. Moscow. 1956. (Translated from English.)
Mallon. A. Teleilat Ghassul, vols. 1–2. Rome. 1934–40.
References in periodicals archive ?
The portrayal of horned masks would be quite plausible as animal horns and their replicas played a significant role in the cubic practices and iconography of the Ghassulian culture (Elliott 1977: 6).
However, radiocarbon analyses situate the Ghassulian culture, and the 'Processional' scene, within the fifth millennium cal BC (Bourke et al.
The international set of some two dozen authors try to stick to their brief but it is the presentation of site-specific data that takes the lion's share; the contributors do however consider, for example, whether there is still a case for the Ghassulian culture (yes), what the desert pastoralist Timnian culture that lasts millennia represents (a stimulating paper by Rosen), or what the analysis of pottery inclusions or metal alloys can contribute.