Ghirlandaio


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Ghirlandaio

, Ghirlandajo
Domenico . original name Domenico Bigordi. 1449--94, Italian painter of frescoes
References in periodicals archive ?
Ghirlandaio also pushes realism to new extremes by depicting the man's deformed nose in unsparing detail.
834, School of Domenico Ghirlandaio, panel; reproduction, George Kaftal, Iconography of the Saints in Tuscan Painting (Florence: Sansoni, 1952), figure 1149; Gubbio, S.
For the document recording the evaluation by Bugiardini and Ridolfo Ghirlandaio, see Laura Pagnoto, Giuliano Bugiardini (Turin: Umberto Allemandi, 1987), 244, no.
To this school, directed by Donatello's pupil Bertoldo di Giovanni, he earnestly wished to recruit Michelangelo; so he borrowed the son of Lodovico Buonarroti and the apprentice of Ghirlandaio at a handsome interest.
While neither Ghirlandaio nor Botticelli really did justice to himself in the chapel, Perugino positively excelled, executing an undisputed masterpiece--and one of the finest frescoes of the fifteenth century--on the north wall of the chapel.
While masters like Masolino, Fra Angelico, and Domenico Ghirlandaio garner much attention, those engaging with Northern models outside Florence's orbit--Piero della Francesca, Pisanello, and Antonello da Messina chief among them--are neglected by comparison.
Botticelli completed these works alongside compositions by Perugino, Rosselli and Ghirlandaio (26 years later, a young painter by the name of Michelangelo Buonarotti would begin painting the ceiling of the same chapel).
What the experts say: There is unanimous agreement among art historians that the person is John, a young man that other artists of the period - Castagno and Ghirlandaio - rendered as an androgynous or feminine figure.
At the most recent Congress on Medieval Studies, Maria de Prano of UCLA, gave a paper on the celebrated portrait by Domenico Ghirlandaio, "Giovanna degli Albizzi Tomabuoni", Cat.
It is on loan from London's National Gallery, along with two other Renaissance masterpieces, named The Virgin and Child, by Renaissance artists Ghirlandaio and Titian.
They include greats such as Fra Angelico, Masaccio, Domenico Ghirlandaio, Perugio, Andrea Mantegna, and, in the 16th century, giants like Raphael, Michelangelo, Titian, and Tintoretto.
Thus when he found what he called the "animated accessories" of billowing hair and fluttering drapery in the work of Botticelli and Ghirlandaio, Warburg read them as psychic gestures.